September 26, 2014

Five students hospitalized amidst rumors of drugged drinks

By Simon Isham, Jacob Abrahamson, Olivia Krauth, David Cecil & Raquel Wolter–

Emergency Medical Services rushed five students to area hospitals last weekend, Sept. 19 – 21, after campus parties.  EMS told police at least one student had been drugged while attending a fraternity party.

On Sun. Sept. 21, a woman from Unitas Tower was taken to the hospital after attending a fraternity party, according to police reports.

The student told police that prior to becoming ill early Sunday morning, she had been approached at the fraternity party by a white male with long, brown or blond hair, who was wearing a blue striped shirt. According to police reports, he had shown interest in her, which she rejected multiple times.

The woman, who wishes to remain anonymous, gave the Dean of Students Michael Mardis permission to release the information that she had been ill with a virus and had a panic attack, causing the illness.

‘The toxicology reports stated that there were no drugs found in my system, and I was released,” continued the student’s statement. Police reports say she had not been drinking alcohol that night.

Major David James of ULPD said that the date rape drug of choice in Louisville, GHB, is the equivalent of 15 to 20 beers. GHB is detectable in a blood or urine test, which are separate from a normal toxicology test and have to be ordered specifically.

Early Sat. Sept. 20, three women and one man from Kurz Hall were taken to Norton and University Hospital’s ERs.  Three were listed as intoxicated on police reports, and one woman was found unconscious in her room on her side, vomiting and unable to answer the door. It is believed that these four cases are related to each other.

ULPD Assistant Chief of Police Kenny Brown said that no arrests have been made in connection to the five incidents. He also said no assaults have been reported in connection.

“It is a little unusual, as far as what we have seen and what the Dean of Students has seen, in that nature and that many runs would be a little more than normal for sure,” said Brown on the high number of incidents. “Normal would probably be nothing.”

Brown said that ULPD has turned the investigation over to the Dean of Students office.

“The dean’s office is going to look at it administratively, if there was anything done out of the ordinary, and certainly if any of the students would want to pursue something, they could certainly do that. I think we could run (an investigation) jointly, but right now we do not really have a crime. We have some people who may have gotten — may have overindulged,” Brown said.

“If we get a situation where we think there is a Greek organization, or any University organization that is violating university policies, or jeopardizing the well-being of our students, we follow up with those organizations and try to gather more information,” said Mardis after being asked how allegations against Greek organizations are handled. Mardis added that his office also meets with chapter leadership and advisers.

10 thoughts on “Five students hospitalized amidst rumors of drugged drinks

  1. A new nail polish has been made that reacts and changes color when it comes in contact with GHB, Xanex, and rophipnol-maybe we need to get this on campus!

  2. Or.. you know.. we could teach people not to put things in others drinks and hold those who do accountable. Because really, all that nail polish does is add to the long list of things that women are “supposed” to do in order to stay safe.

    1. We have been trying to teach people not to murder since the ten commandments, how’s that working out thus far?
      Teaching someone to be proactively defensive doesnt excuse the attacker, nor does it put all the blame on the victim.

  3. I don’t understand how a girl that had a virus and panic attack, that didn’t drink at the party, and got approached by a guy that she thought was creepy, but didn’t offer her any drugs or wasn’t reported having been seen giving someone drugs has anything at all to do with the issue being reported in the article. This girl is completely unrelated to the issue. She wasn’t drugged, they know it was just a virus/panic attack, and her opinion about how a guy acted has literally nothing to do with the five students who actually were tested positive for these drugs. I just don’t understand the point of reporting that unnecessary information, unless there was more that she offered that wasn’t put in this article.

  4. “The toxicology reports stated that there were no drugs found in my system, and I was released”

    …so why are you all pointing fingers when the student said she wasn’t drugged? Seems like she should go through the Alcohol Awareness course like I did when I got busted for being drunk in my dorm.

    Its great that you all are bringing awareness to the issue of date rape drugs, but its wrong to mention fraternities when they aren’t even at fault. There are just as many desperate, young males, and yes even females that drug drinks. One of my buddies was drugged at a Logan’s Roadhouse of all places. Instead of pointing fingers at one subgroup, point the finger at the whole group instead. Raise awareness to everyone instead of singling out innocent people based on media stereotypes. I wish this comment could be somehow broadcasted because I am pretty disappointed in this article.

  5. I don’t understand why this newspaper website deleted my comment earlier, but I’ll gladly post it once more. The witness account of the woman who got taken to the hospital for a virus/panic attack has nothing to do with the issue at hand presented by the article except for the fact that she just so happened to have gone to the party where the incident occurred at. Her report of going to the hospital for a virus/panic attack and being hit on at the party by a guy who in her opinion was creepy, has nothing to do with the real fact that 5 students were found to have drugs in their system. She wasn’t drugged, she didn’t see anyone administer the drug or pressure her into taking the drug, and ultimately her report in this article is completely useless, puff journalism.

  6. The witness account of the woman who got taken to the hospital for a virus/panic attack has nothing to do with the issue at hand presented by the article except for the fact that she just so happened to have gone to the party where the incident occurred at. Her report of going to the hospital for a virus/panic attack and being hit on at the party by a guy who in her opinion was creepy, has nothing to do with the real fact that 5 students were found to have drugs in their system. She wasn’t drugged, she didn’t see anyone administer the drug or pressure her into taking the drug, and ultimately her report in this article is completely useless, puff journalism.

  7. This is a very poorly written article. I have no idea who was drugged and what actually happened. The beginning states a student was drugged, however there is no other mention of it in this article. This should be the main focus in my opinion, not an aside only briefly mentioned. The opening story of the girl who talked to a guy at the party seems to be unrelated to everything else going on. Why do we care what happened to her when it is completely unrelated to the druggings?

    I would love to see a re-write of this that is more clear and more precise. This is an important issue and it is being entirely misrepresented due to subpar journalism.

  8. Mandy – That’s just ignorant. You’re also assuming people who realize that the nail polish is a good idea, are people who think we shouldn’t challenge rape culture. Your elitism is disgusting. You’re the kind of person who would rather women not get any help, than have women get help you don’t consider acceptable.

  9. Mandy,

    We have been trying to teach people not to murder since the ten commandments. How is that working out for us thus far?
    Teaching people to defend themselves doesnt excuse the perpetrator nor do it place the burden on the victim.

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