Skip the lunch line with Grubhub

By Grace Welsh–

Grubhub offers busy students a quick and easy way to order their food ahead and, as their slogan reads, “skip the line.”

This year, the University of Louisville has partnered with Grubhub to help students order their meals ahead of arrival.

Students simply download the app, log in with their university ID and are able to order and pay with flex points and/or meal swipes so their food can be ready when they arrive.

Grubhub, popularly used as a delivery service, is currently offered on campus at Starbucks at both locations on campus, McAlister’s Deli, Subway, Panda Express, Einstein Bros Bagels, Twisted Taco, Prime Grill, Sandwich Shack and Olilo.

Grubhub is a favorite choice among busy students. Freshman Jayda Richards uses Grubhub roughly once a week to pre-order her favorite meal at Subway.

To her, it’s not only easier, but cuts down time and prevents having to wait in unexpectedly long lines. “They usually do a good job and get the food out early,” she said. “I like to use it before work so I don’t have to worry about being on time.”

Freshman Caleigh Richard-Goos typically uses Grubhub on campus twice a week to order her favorite drink, a coconut milk mocha macchiato, from the Starbucks in the SAC. As a member of the Cardinal row-team, Richards-Goos gets out of practice at 8:30 a.m, and likes to get her coffee as quickly as she can before her 9 a.m. class.

She said that she’s run into problems having to wait a long time to pick up her order at other restaurants. “I love that I can use the app. If I’m in a pinch and running late, I can order it on the way,” she said, “Starbucks in the SAC is the only place I order from regularly.”

However, with sudden influxes of students, it can be difficult to keep track of Grubhub and in-person orders.

Senior Davy Adams, an employee at Starbucks in the library, says that well over 270 Grubhub orders come through their system daily. Adams mentioned that they sometimes run into problems with the application, run out of an item or are hit with a sudden wave of people.

“Sometimes we have to turn it off because we are so busy, but all-in-all, it helps people order ahead so rushes are less. It evenly distributes the traffic,” they said.

Graphic by Shayla Kerr//The Louisville Cardinal

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