The Louisville Cardinal U of L's Independent Student Newspaper 2017-03-29T04:05:00Z http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/feed/atom/ WordPress http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/media/2016/05/cropped-lc-logo-1-32x32.png Shelby Brown <![CDATA[SGA plans to give Final Four funds back to students]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=47006 2017-03-29T04:05:00Z 2017-03-29T04:05:00Z By Shelby Brown– SGA plans to allocate their $20,000 budget overage to student support services. The overage came from the loss of U of L’s basketball teams to make it to the NCAA Final Four. Originally, $10,000 was set aside in the SGA budget for both the men’s and women’s basketball teams for student travel. Traditionally students […]

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By Shelby Brown–

SGA plans to allocate their $20,000 budget overage to student support services. The overage came from the loss of U of L’s basketball teams to make it to the NCAA Final Four.

Originally, $10,000 was set aside in the SGA budget for both the men’s and women’s basketball teams for student travel. Traditionally students have traveled to support U of L in the Final Four. This year, the women’s basketball team would have played in Dallas, the men in Phoenix.

During the Student Senate meeting, SGA President Aaron Vance said the funds would focus on student support services like the counseling center.

“We know that they (students) want to see more counselors,” Vance said. “And if we’re on the cusp and if this is what’s holding us back, the budget situation, we (SGA) want to be able to help.”

Vance indicated funds will be allocated to Ekstrom library as well.

“We’ll help the best we can,” Vance said. “Tough times call for tough measures. If everyone else is chipping in we need to be doing that as well, in a way that will really help students out.”

Vance also spoke on the student’s concerns about the student athletic fee. He called the fee an “ongoing issue.”

“Students notice when their bills are a little higher,” Vance said. “This one more so because students don’t understand where it goes. We all know that it’s just a blank check to athletics.”

U of L’s SGA hopes for a phasing out of the fee. This has been seen on the University of Kentucky’s campus.

“It can be done,” Vance said. “I don’t think this is a Herculean task by any means.”

Currently SGA is investigating whether removing the fee would increase student ticket prices.

“Every fee, under state law is supposed to have a direct purpose,” Vance said.” The original purpose of it (fee) was to stabilize the athletic budget. I would say $100 million in revenue generation is pretty stable.”

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Jeff Milby http://louisvillecardinal.com <![CDATA[Baseball cruises past Western Kentucky 11-1]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=46989 2017-03-29T02:23:58Z 2017-03-29T02:23:58Z By Jeff Milby– No. 2-ranked baseball (22-2, 8-1 ACC) easily defeated in-state rival Western Kentucky (9-17, 3-3) at Jim Patterson Stadium. The Cardinals dominated from start to finish, ending with a 11-1 win. “Our depth is our strength, and we need them all,” coach Dan McDonnell said. “We need all the pitchers, we got some […]

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By Jeff Milby–

No. 2-ranked baseball (22-2, 8-1 ACC) easily defeated in-state rival Western Kentucky (9-17, 3-3) at Jim Patterson Stadium. The Cardinals dominated from start to finish, ending with a 11-1 win.

“Our depth is our strength, and we need them all,” coach Dan McDonnell said. “We need all the pitchers, we got some hitters in the lineup tonight (that don’t usually play).”

It took four pitches for Louisville starter Shane Hummel to make it out of the first inning. Given that strong start on the mound, the Cards’ bats didn’t wait long to get into the action either. After a ground out to start their half of the first inning, junior Colby Fitch doubled off the left field wall. Junior Devin Hairston sent Fitch home on the next at bat.

In the second inning, Louisville tacked on two more. Freshman Tyler Fitzgerald and senior Ryan Summers both singled off WKU’s Jeff Ciocco. A wild pitch advanced both runners, and then Fitch grounded out to first base, scoring Fitzgerald from third. A Devin Hairston single to second base scored Summers, and Louisville lead 3-0 at the end of two innings.

Western Kentucky got one back in the third when Colie Currie tripled down the right field line, then scored on a Kevin Lambert ground-out to second base.

The Cardinals put two more runs across the plate in the fifth, as designated hitter Brendan McKay led off with a single to left-center. A Colin Lyman bunt-hit saw McKay advance to second and then third after a Western’s third field error error. Devin Mann’s sacrifice-fly allowed McKay to tag up from third. Lyman then scored as Fitzgerald clubbed his first career triple to extend the lead to 5-1.

That wouldn’t be the only rally McKay would start.

With two outs in the sixth, the Darlington, Pa. native slapped a single to left field, and then advanced to second on a wild pitch. A Drew Ellis walk prefaced a Lyman single, which scored McKay, who was running on the pitch. McKay’s second run of the day increased the Louisville lead to five runs.

Stowers and Summers scored on two separate errors in the seventh for Louisville, while McKay continued his strong day with an RBI double, scoring Fitch. Louisville led 9-1 after seven innings.

The Cardinals’ Logan Ryan scored in the eighth from a single from Michael Bollmer, and Fitzgerald scored his second run of the on a wild pitch, extending the lead to ten runs with the score 11-1 after eight, and that finished the scoring.

Louisville next takes the field against No. 16 Virginia on March 31 in Charlotesville.

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Shelby Brown <![CDATA[Open carry firearm walk planned for Friday]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=46984 2017-03-29T03:38:28Z 2017-03-28T23:27:55Z By Shelby Brown– Gun advocates will carry firearms around campus March 31 to start a conversation about concealed carry. Participants will assemble at 11 a.m. at Third Street and Cardinal Boulevard before walking the border of campus. Participants will range from being unarmed to having a long gun slung over their shoulder. Event organizer Jeffry Smith […]

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By Shelby Brown–

Gun advocates will carry firearms around campus March 31 to start a conversation about concealed carry. Participants will assemble at 11 a.m. at Third Street and Cardinal Boulevard before walking the border of campus.

Participants will range from being unarmed to having a long gun slung over their shoulder. Event organizer Jeffry Smith said all weapons will be “holstered or carried in a safe manner.”

“We are not demonstrators, just gun owners looking to help educate folks,” U of L student Ilya Chernyavskiy, who will walk with an AR-15 rifle, said.

Student sponsor Aaron Spalding said while the group will be carrying firearms openly during the walk, conversation is the goal.

“We’re open carrying as a catalyst to start conversation,” Spalding said, adding they’re pushing for concealed carry. “We’re not going to approach anybody that doesn’t want to talk … If anyone wants to come up, that’s great.”

Concealed weapons are not allowed on U of L’s campus. Students caught with a weapon are subject to disciplinary action, up to and including expulsion.

“Concealed carry should be allowed on campus because prohibiting it treats honest citizens differently for no reason and because doing so makes campuses and their surroundings easy targets for criminals. Criminals don’t follow laws or policy. Feelings should not trump the right to self-defense,” Chernyavskiy said.

While the event is organized and sponsored by students, the U of L Students for Concealed Carry is not affiliated.

“SCC does not officially support or oppose open carry of firearms, or this event,” the SCC’s statement said March 13. “However, anyone is free to watch or participate in this walk. Several of our members will be in the walk, but not as members of SCC, just as students and gun owners.”

Spalding, a member of SCC, said the group could not reach an unanimous stance on open carry.

Discussion on the event page raised concerns about the recent shooting at the Tim Faulkner Art Gallery that left one student, Savannah Walker, dead. Sarah Lynn Cunningham said having an open carry firearm walk so soon after the shooting is “selfish and insensitive.”

Spalding says he is willing to meet with students or faculty if they are “triggered” by guns.

“If they want to talk or meet without a gun to voice their concerns, we can do that. I want to make improvements about how we can communicate,” Spalding said.

The group has provided their route and walking times for those who wish to avoid them. Information is also available on their public Facebook page.

 

 

 

 

 

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Kyeland Jackson <![CDATA[Trump rally reveals disconnect between message and action]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=46957 2017-03-28T17:52:10Z 2017-03-28T13:00:56Z By Kyeland Jackson — Thousands gathered March 20 for President Donald Trump to rally support in the bluegrass state. His messages were good. His delivery – better. But between chants of “USA” and “build that wall,” supporters didn’t realize they were being lied to. Trump’s policies are no stranger to anyone. Pro-American, nationalist rhetoric backs […]

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By Kyeland Jackson —

Thousands gathered March 20 for President Donald Trump to rally support in the bluegrass state. His messages were good. His delivery – better. But between chants of “USA” and “build that wall,” supporters didn’t realize they were being lied to.

Trump’s policies are no stranger to anyone. Pro-American, nationalist rhetoric backs his support for policies constricting immigration, changing trade deals and bringing back American jobs.

He said coal jobs will come back. Then why did he propose slashing funding for federal programs promoting coal states like Kentucky?

Reuters reported Trump’s suggestions would cut funding from the Appalachian Regional Commission and the U.S. Economic Development Administration, two federal programs training and retaining coal workers in Appalachia and coal counties across the U.S. ARC expects to create more than  23,000 jobs and to train and educate over 49,000 students and workers.

“Each year ARC provides funding for several hundred investments in the Appalachian Region, in areas such as business development, education and job training, telecommunications, infrastructure, community development, housing and transportation,” Reuter’s website said. “These projects create thousands of new jobs; improve local water and sewer systems; increase school readiness; expand access to health care; assist local communities with strategic planning; and provide technical and managerial assistance to emerging businesses.”

Coal jobs are not sustainable – especially with the progression of clean, renewable energy. That doesn’t mean coal miners should be forgotten. The industry has funded Appalachia for generations, and it deserves equatable finances to support its workers as energy reliance changes. But with possible cuts to support for coal counties and passage of right-to-work legislation – promoting the de-funding of unions –  Trump supporters are shooting themselves in the foot.

It’s not the first time Trump’s words hid actions flying in the face of his supporters. Look at his promise to repeal Obamacare, force Mexico to pay for a wall and bring back jobs. But without critical thought into the president’s attractive words, supporters don’t even know they’re being lied to. Worse yet, they’re told the liberal media lies and leads them astray. With a rabid supporter base eager to relive a nostalgic past and quick to discredit traditional news, Trump is free to continue passage of bills and policies hurting his consumers.

Another bill promising pain for supporters and detractors alike is his tax plan and efforts to bring businesses back to America. The tax plan promises tax cuts to the middle and upper class, encouraging spending into the economy. While it sounds good on paper, independent economists anticipated the plan would cost trillions to implement. Costs for such proposed cuts would need to come from elsewhere, likely increasing taxes on food or gas. The costs would further increase with Trump’s proposal to incentivize businesses in order to keep them in America.

It’s a typical bait and switch tactic, but with broad impact on supporters and detractors alike. Regardless of ideological differences, Trump’s ideas sounded appealing during his rally. But someone who’s untrue to their word is either a coward, liar or unaware of the impact their words have. As president, his words are important. For Trump’s supporters, banking on his words to shepherd them into the nostalgic promised land, his word is all they have.

Whether it’s through more critical processing or more caution, something has to change. For the benefit of news reporters, it will mean more transparency from the federal government. For his supporters, it means realizing his promises were not kept. In fact, those promises were used against them.

File photo / The Louisville Cardinal

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Aaron Hartley <![CDATA[With “More Life,” Drake offers up more of the same]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=46917 2017-03-26T18:28:06Z 2017-03-27T14:26:20Z By Aaron Hartley– Listeners know what to expect from Drake at this point. If you put on a Drake album, you’re going to get some catchy pop rap, R&B and dancehall hits, likely about himself, his girl problems and his feelings. This has always been the way it is, but the formula is simply beginning […]

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By Aaron Hartley–

Listeners know what to expect from Drake at this point. If you put on a Drake album, you’re going to get some catchy pop rap, R&B and dancehall hits, likely about himself, his girl problems and his feelings. This has always been the way it is, but the formula is simply beginning to wear thin.

“More Life” is the latest project from Drake, deemed a “playlist,” but not bearing any discernable difference between a conventional album or mixtape other than semantics.

With 22 songs adding up to an hour and twenty minutes, “More Life” can be an exhausting full listen. And simply put, many of these tracks sound so similar, there is little here to make a straight-through listen worthwhile or interesting.

That’s not to say there aren’t a few gems on this record. “Passionfruit” is a catchy dancehall track that doesn’t deviate far from traditional Drake, but highlights the sound that he’s good at. Unfortunately, many of the songs in the rest of the album, especially in the second half, begin to meld together. Occasionally the features standout even more so than Drake on his own album.

Sampha, who released his debut earlier this year, has his own song “4422” which is lovely and may be the best song on the album. Young Thug brings his signature quirkiness with his feature on “Ice Melts” adding a bit of light to the second half of “More Life,” but not enough.

“More Life” is not a bad record. It’s more of what we’ve come to expect from Drake, which has worked well in the past, but is beginning to become predictable. His last record, “Views,” made some attempts to mix up Drake’s formula, but fell short. “More Life” feels like it picks up right where “Views” left off and suffers for it.

Drake is a good rapper and has released some excellent projects (see “If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late”), but “More Life” just does not feel like it does enough creatively. There is a handful of good material there, but it’s just surrounded bloat and throwaway tracks. Whatever Drake does next, I’m hoping he takes us all by surprise instead of offering what we’ve come to expect.

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Kyeland Jackson <![CDATA[Faculty to demand greater role in university governance]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=46925 2017-03-28T17:52:24Z 2017-03-27T13:19:27Z By Kyeland Jackson — U of L’s A&S faculty assembly will demand a greater role in governance via two resolutions, citing consequences reaped from the former central administration and the $48 million budget shortfall. The first resolution demands faculty involvement, asking a special faculty committee be created and placed in a role closely helping govern […]

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By Kyeland Jackson —

U of L’s A&S faculty assembly will demand a greater role in governance via two resolutions, citing consequences reaped from the former central administration and the $48 million budget shortfall.

The first resolution demands faculty involvement, asking a special faculty committee be created and placed in a role closely helping govern U of L. The second resolution, addressed to Arts and Sciences Dean Kimberly Kempf-Leonard, voices the faculty’s disdain for budget cutting propositions, asking furloughs, layoffs, closures and mergers for academic programs not be considered to address the budget shortfall.

Both resolutions, penned by American Association of Professors President Avery Kolers and Vice President Susan Jarosi, were approved, but with dissent. Political science professor Jasmine Farrier questioned the impact of the resolution which demands a faculty committee to participate in governance be created and the university increase transparency by supplying financial documents instead of presenting them. Farrier said faculty cannot make concrete demands of the administration, and power lies with Enid Trucios-Haynes – the faculty representative on the board of trustees.

“There is no record of any vote that would be substantive, in my experience, in the faculty senate. That’s a fact,” Farrier said.

Farrier challenged faculty to put teeth in the resolution, suggesting to aim it towards the faculty senate or changing its resolutions.

Other senators worried the resolution failed to capture the gravity of budget situation;  a dismal budget could look bad to the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, U of L’s accrediting body, and Moody’s debt rating service. Moody’s changed U of L’s debt rating in 2016, citing weak investment returns and unabated investments.

“The house may be on fire and the president may think he owns it, but I live here and I don’t want it to burn down around my ears,” associate English professor Beth Willey said. “We are facing a serious threat by SACS to add this as another problem with accreditation if we don’t get our finances in order.”

Faculty approved the two resolutions with more than 40 votes supporting them. The resolutions will now be revised and submitted to the central administration and Kempf-Leonard.

U of L scrambled for money after news $48 million is needed to balance next year’s budget spread. The foundation’s questionable spending forced Interim President Greg Postel and U of L’s Board of Trustees to curtail its money while a forensic audit investigates ULF’s finances. The university further compensated via budget cuts and a partial hiring freeze. Acting Provost Dale Billingsley said the university-wide hiring freeze ended, but said hiring freeze authority was given to deans to use as they see fit for their colleges.

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Conner Farrell <![CDATA[Baseball takes series against the Wolfpack]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=46937 2017-03-28T18:07:27Z 2017-03-26T22:35:54Z By Conner Farrell–  The baseball team finished their weekend three-game series with NC State by winning 8-1. The Cards won two out of the three games against the Wolfpack. The first game of the series was the sole loss for the team in Raleigh, losing 3-1. The Cards only mustered seven hits on offense with […]

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By Conner Farrell– 

The baseball team finished their weekend three-game series with NC State by winning 8-1. The Cards won two out of the three games against the Wolfpack.

The first game of the series was the sole loss for the team in Raleigh, losing 3-1. The Cards only mustered seven hits on offense with the only run for the team coming in the sixth inning on an RBI double for shortstop Devin Hairston.

Starting pitcher Brendan McKay was accredited with the loss, his first of the season. McKay went seven innings giving up six hits and three runs.

In the second game, Louisville held off the Wolfpack in extra innings, 7-6.

The scoring on both sides came with a fast start, NC State scored their first two runs in the first two innings. The Cards responded in the third inning scoring four runs.

Catcher Colby Fitch scored two on a single. In the next at bat, second basemen Devin Mann homered to left field for two RBIs.

The following inning NC State responded with a run of their own, making the score 4-3.

The offense cooled off until the seventh when Fitch produced a solo home-run.

Hairston tacked onto the lead in the eighth with a RBI sac-fly, making the score 6-3 going into the final inning.

With two outs in the bottom of the ninth, NC State’s Joe Dunand tied the game at 6-6 with a three-run homer.

The game ended in the 10th inning after State was unable to match the final run scored by Hairston, an RBI single.

The final game of the weekend featured the Cards winning 8-1. Third baseman Drew Ellis hit a solo home-run in the second inning to ignite the scoring.

In the third inning, second baseman Mann continued his hot batting and hit a solo homer to left. McKay singled to right to score two runs. Ellis was able to score McKay from first for his second RBI of the game.

At the top of fourth, catcher Zeke Pinkham and DH Fitch each added a run, pushing the lead to 6-0.

The Cards added their last two runs in the eighth as Mann singled to left field to score one. Center fielder Logan Taylor scored on an error from NC State.

State would score their only run in the game in the bottom of the ninth.

Starting pitcher Nick Bennett got the win, pitching five innings and registering four strike-outs.

The team is back in action at Jim Patterson Stadium March 28 as they take on Western Kentucky at 6 p.m.

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Jordan Shim http://louisvillecardinal.com <![CDATA[Women’s soccer defeats NKU 4-0]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=46582 2017-03-26T19:00:32Z 2017-03-26T18:37:40Z By Jordan Shim– Fresh off their 10-0 win over Liberia during spring break in Costa Rica, the Louisville women’s soccer team defeated Northern Kentucky 4-0 in a preseason match on March 24. Brooklynn Rivers continued her progression from last season, adding two goals and an assist. Arianna Ferraro scored a goal and assisted one, and newcomer […]

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By Jordan Shim–

Fresh off their 10-0 win over Liberia during spring break in Costa Rica, the Louisville women’s soccer team defeated Northern Kentucky 4-0 in a preseason match on March 24.

Brooklynn Rivers continued her progression from last season, adding two goals and an assist. Arianna Ferraro scored a goal and assisted one, and newcomer Kennadi Carbin scored her first goal at Lynn Stadium.

U of L struck first after eight minutes. Ferraro passed to Rivers, who placed her shot to the bottom left corner.

The Cards doubled the advantage in the 18th minute. Sarah Feola beat her defender with pace on the right flank and centered the ball to Rivers. She dribbled past NKU goalkeeper Jennifer Farwell. Instead of taking a shot from an awkward angle, Rivers found Ferraro, who finished from six yards.

Louisville made it 3-0 before the half-hour, with Rivers involved in the action yet again. She had a clear lane to the box after a cheeky spin past her marker and fired low from close range.

Carbin made it 4-0 in the 39th minute. She controlled a cross and made her way into the box in between two defenders. She turned her marker with her left and finished to the right post.

Louisville plays Vanderbilt on April 1. They return home in their preseason finale to face Western Kentucky on April 13. Kickoff for that match is scheduled for 8:00 p.m.

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Dalton Ray <![CDATA[Club hockey and rugby take steps to build their programs]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=46915 2017-03-28T17:52:42Z 2017-03-26T14:00:03Z By Dalton Ray– The University of Louisville is known for its athletics. With some of the top athletics facilities and one of the biggest college sports markets in the nation, it’s easy to see why the school thrives in its 21 varsity sports. Like other universities, U of L also offers club sports, including men’s […]

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By Dalton Ray–

The University of Louisville is known for its athletics. With some of the top athletics facilities and one of the biggest college sports markets in the nation, it’s easy to see why the school thrives in its 21 varsity sports.

Like other universities, U of L also offers club sports, including men’s lacrosse, ultimate frisbee, bowling and fencing. Two club sports that are picking up support are the hockey and rugby teams.

Between no on-campus facilities, little funding and juggling of school with athletics, it’s not easy being a student-athlete for a club sport. There is a slight comparison to club student-athletes and varsity student-athletes, but the club student-athlete doesn’t get the benefits during or after college the varsity student-athlete does.

With little reward to club sports, all players come out for one reason: love for the game.

“(Playing club hockey at Louisville) gives me a chance to continue to play the sport I love while attending a great school,” sophomore Yiannis Soukas said. “It’s really not about getting any type of reward out of it, but I enjoy playing hockey at a competitive level and playing hockey at U of L gives me that opportunity.”

Freshman Kameron Gladney plays club rugby for the same reason.

“I do it because I have a passion for the game and I know God has me here for a reason not just for rugby but for this university,” Gladney said. “We’re making history.”

Hockey coach Brian Graham and rugby coach Emil Walton both volunteer their time to coach after being approached by players to run the program. Graham runs an insurance agency and Walton owns a remodeling and design company. After 5 p.m., you can find Graham in the rink and Walton on the pitch.

Graham is originally from Connecticut and graduated from the University of Kentucky. He played for UK for three years and coached for two. After denying the U of L job serval times, Graham finally accepted in 2011.

“I love the game and I love to watch kids grow with the game,” Graham said. “None of these guys here are going pro, they’re here getting their degree. Some of the guys will be engineers, gym teachers, business owners. I want to give them their last bit of competitive hockey before that.”

Born in Namibia and growing up in South Africa, Walton spent his life traveling and playing rugby. After settling in Louisville with his wife, Walton played for the city’s club team for 10 years. Walton sees the value of coaching past money.

“My payment is seeing these kids develop into elite players. My payment is knowing that with the right guidance these kids will take the lessons taught through the game of rugby and implement it in life after college,” Walton said. “Rugby is more than a sport and I’ve seen it change people into better versions of themselves. If I change the life of one kid, then that’s payment enough.”

St. X graduate Nick Nuss is a geography major that has been playing hockey in Louisville since his youth.

“I play hockey for the love of the sport,” Nuss said. “It is going out on the ice for practice and ultimately going out there and competing in games.  Second, is for the school, I love U of L and being able to wear the Cardinal on my chest is an honor.”

The hockey team has yielded increasing success since Graham took over. The Cardinals currently play in the Tri-State Collegiate Hockey League, an American Club Hockey Association Division II level ice hockey league with 10 other schools. Their regular season takes place from September through February. The team’s home matches are played at Iceland Sports Complex.

The Cardinals finished 2016-2017 with a program-best 28-9-1 record and won their third straight TSCHL playoff conference championship. U of L lost to Penn State in regionals, who finished No. 18 in the M2 National Tournament final rankings.

Six players were selected to the TSCHL All-Star team: Soukas, Nuss, senior Deek Piekarczyk, sophomore Tyler Bradford, freshman Shane Cross and freshman Collin Frederick. Graham is also helping coach.

Soukas is a physical education major from Canada. A friend of Soukas played for the club two years ago and when Graham reached out, Soukas joined.

“The fans’ backing our hockey team is far better than anything I ever expected coming to Louisville, of all places to play hockey,” Soukas said. “We normally average about a hundred fans a game but we recently broke our record for attendance at our last home game (against) UK where we had to turn people away due to capacity issues with our rink.”

Graham uses his connections to pull players to the city because Louisville isn’t a hotbed for hockey. Establishing a winning program, Graham thinks the team can take the next step up, but finances play a huge role.

“I’d love to see this be a Division I club team … it’s a matter of getting funding from the school. Of the 60 schools in ACHA Divison I, about 90 percent get funding from the school. We don’t get any,” Graham said. “We’re self-funded and each three grand to play. We’re fortunate to get a good gate at games and have sponsors, but we still have a lot of ground to make up.”

Patrick Wilbourn heard of rugby from a friend and was hooked during the first practice. Wilbourn said the relationship between players on the team is unlike anything he has seen and there is a buzz around the program.

“When people find out I play rugby for the club, it’s usually followed by questions and wanting more information,” Wilbourn said. “Most of the questions are out of curiosity about the program, which is why I believe this program would take off if backed by the university.”

Founded in 2008, the rugby team’s season is split into the fall and spring seasons. Fall is played with 15 players and 40-minute halves while the spring is played with seven players and seven-minute halves. Louisville plays their home games at Cherokee Park.

While the hockey team has enjoyed recent success, rugby has had tough sailing in the D1AA Mid-American Conference. The Cardinals are 1-8-1 in conference the past two years and Walton is expected to turn the program around. Joining the team in the summer of 2016, he has seen a change in the team.

“The culture within the program took a significant turn in the direction of taking this game more seriously. The work ethic is phenomenal. The players started realizing that the more work they put in on and off the field, the better the results personally and as a program,” Walton said. “The commitment to this team and each other has elevated our game into a program that has the ability to perform at a very high level.”

Senior Ryan Whitaker is the president of the club and said Walton has changed the program.

“(Walton) came in, taught us the right way to play and everyone picked it up immediately. The two previous years, we won one game and lost eight. Last fall, we were one point away from going to the MAC tournament,” Whitaker said.

Junior Larome White and senior Pio Vatuvei were both selected to the All-American Camp to try out for the USA Collegiate team, making Louisville the only D1AA school to have two players sent.

The team is midway through their spring season. Gladney joined the team after being recruited from Texas and said the program is surging.

“I was recruited by the last coach not knowing he was leaving … I just took a leap of faith,” Gladney said. “Teams know we are on the rise. Now that we have beat some good teams we have slowly been challenging ourselves by playing powerhouses like Notre Dame and Lindenwood. We also recruit out of state like myself and Tommy Luc from Maryland.”

Walton said the goal for the rugby team is the be a varsity sport, but that time is down the line.

“That’s the end goal, but at this point in time we are taking it one step at a time,” Walton said. “I think that it will be beneficial for U of L to help us with some funding and facilities to grow this program. Kutztown and the University of Notre Dame, for example, is a club sports program, but they have lured kids from all over because of a program that they have established.”

Like hockey, funding is an issue. Walton said if the school can help fund them, the players who come will bring the money back to the university by attending school.

“With an operating budget of $50,000 per year and a facility that we can utilize in the winter, we can establish and develop a decent program that will have a foundation to build on,” Walton said. “Once we have established that winning program, potential student-athletes will want to come. The return on investment is huge.”

For both programs, the teams are gaining exposure and fan support. Over time, rugby and hockey could both take the next step. And with the right funding, both could one day be a varsity sport for the University of Louisville.

If you’re interested in joining the hockey team, contact Graham at coach@cardsicehockey.com. For rugby, contact Walton at cardsrugbymanagement@gmail.com.

Photo by Thomas Luc / Louisville Rugby

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Dalton Ray <![CDATA[Baylor too much for women’s basketball, Cards’ season ends in Sweet 16]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=46907 2017-03-26T18:39:51Z 2017-03-25T03:55:08Z By Dalton Ray– Playing in the Sweet 16 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, one seed Baylor thumped four seed women’s basketball 97-63. BU’s size dictated the game as U of L struggled to shoot in the lane, pull down rebounds and defend the Bears in the paint. Baylor out-rebounded U of L 52-36 and shot 50 […]

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By Dalton Ray–

Playing in the Sweet 16 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, one seed Baylor thumped four seed women’s basketball 97-63.

BU’s size dictated the game as U of L struggled to shoot in the lane, pull down rebounds and defend the Bears in the paint. Baylor out-rebounded U of L 52-36 and shot 50 percent to Louisville’s 30.

In the first quarter, Baylor separated themselves early. Ripping off a 11-3 run halfway through the quarter, Baylor jumped 19-9. The Cardinals shot 4-of-16 from the field and at one point missed 8-of-10 straight shots. After four free throws to end the quarter, Baylor led 25-9.

Baylor’s Kalani Brown dominated early, recording eight points and eight rebounds in the first 15 minutes. The Bears extended their lead to 34-17 as their size started to play a significant role.

Sophomore Asia Durr, Louisville’s leading scorer, started 0-for-10 and didn’t score until late in the second quarter. With their offensive star struggling, Louisville trailed 43-31 at the half.

For the Bears, Brown and Nina Davis carried the offense and helped BU earn a 54-38 lead in the third quarter. The two finished with 33 points on 14-of-23 shooting with 19 rebounds.

Durr started to heat up in the third quarter, but Baylor showed poise by rolling with the punches and continuing to strike offensively.

Nothing changed in the fourth quarter as Baylor swelled their lead to 34.

Durr finished the game with 21 points on 6-for-21 shooting. Junior Myisha Hines-Allen toted the Louisville offense during Durr’s cold streak, walking away with 10 points and six rebounds. Coming off a hot game against Tennessee, junior Mariya Moore shot 3-for-10 and scored 10 points.

Away from Louisville’s big three, the remaining 10 Cardinals that played scored 19 points.

Louisville finishes the year with 29-8 record and reached their seventh Sweet 16 in program history. The Cardinals graduate two seniors in Cortnee Walton and Briahanna Jackson.

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