The Louisville Cardinal U of L's Independent Student Newspaper 2016-09-29T00:41:33Z http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/feed/atom/ WordPress http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/media/2016/05/cropped-lc-logo-1-32x32.png Jordan Shim http://louisvillecardinal.com <![CDATA[Men’s and women’s soccer rank in top 20]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=39098 2016-09-29T00:41:33Z 2016-09-29T00:40:48Z By Jordan Shim– In the latest NSCAA poll, the Louisville men’s soccer team have risen four spots to No. 9. The Cards also sit No. 2 in the very first NCAA RPI rankings of the year. The women’s soccer team’s success has also been recognized. Soccer America have ranked the Cards at No. 18 following […]

The post Men’s and women’s soccer rank in top 20 appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
By Jordan Shim–

In the latest NSCAA poll, the Louisville men’s soccer team have risen four spots to No. 9. The Cards also sit No. 2 in the very first NCAA RPI rankings of the year. The women’s soccer team’s success has also been recognized. Soccer America have ranked the Cards at No. 18 following their victory over No. 17 Boston College.

Despite being picked to finish fifth in the Atlantic Division of the ACC, the men have exceeded expectations. Having lost to Kentucky on Sept. 6, the Cards are winners of five straight. During this stretch, they have gone 3-0 in conference play, including wins over No. 1 Notre Dame and No. 16 Virginia.

Louisville is highly regarded as one of the nation’s top teams. They are No. 9 in the NCAA Coaches poll. Top Drawer Soccer ranks them at No. 4. And Soccer America rates the Cards as the second best team in the country.

The Cards have hit peak form after a slow start. Much of their success can be credited to the stellar play of newcomer Mohamed Thiaw. The Lexington native is on fire at the moment and has emerged as one of the nation’s premier talents. He currently leads the ACC in goals with seven, game-winning goals with four and points with 15. He has also collected ACC and National player-of-the-week honors.

In a string of eight days starting on Oct. 7, the men will host No. 3 Syracuse and No. 6 Indiana before traveling to No. 11 Wake Forest. They finish the regular season hosting No. 5 Clemson on Oct. 28.

The women are ranked for the first time since 2013, when they were No. 24.

Conference play has begun, and the Cards have shown they can compete with some of the best schools in the country. They shared a point against No. 7 Duke after 110 minutes of play last Friday, then followed that up scoring three unanswered goals to defeat No. 17 Boston College, 3-2, two days later.

Louisville is currently 7-2-2 and are tied for first place with five schools in the vaunted ACC.

The women’s next three matches are at home against No. 18 Notre Dame, NC State and No. 5 Clemson. They are on the road for the next three before returning home for the season finale against No. 11 Virginia.

Photo by Dalton Ray / The Louisville Cardinal

The post Men’s and women’s soccer rank in top 20 appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
0
Kyeland Jackson <![CDATA[Bevin’s board permanently blocked]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=39184 2016-09-28T21:54:05Z 2016-09-28T16:55:07Z By Kyeland Jackson — Governor Matt Bevin’s executive orders, which swept away U of L’s board of trustees for a new 10-member board, were permanently blocked Wednesday. Franklin Circuit Court Judge Phillip Shepherd issued the ruling, permanently blocking Bevin’s executive orders. Attorney General Andy Beshear began the suit shortly after Bevin made his order this summer. […]

The post Bevin’s board permanently blocked appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
By Kyeland Jackson —

Governor Matt Bevin’s executive orders, which swept away U of L’s board of trustees for a new 10-member board, were permanently blocked Wednesday.

Franklin Circuit Court Judge Phillip Shepherd issued the ruling, permanently blocking Bevin’s executive orders. Attorney General Andy Beshear began the suit shortly after Bevin made his order this summer. Beshear issued a statement after Wednesday’s ruling.

“We appreciate Judge Shepherd’s urgency in issuing a final decision in this case. What our students and faculty need now is finality. That is why I am calling on Gov. Bevin to either accept the ruling and appoint trustees to the five openings, or agree to move this case immediately to the Kentucky Supreme Court,” Beshear’s statement said.

Bevin’s executive orders led to a cataclysmic shift in the university. After the board of trustees were abolished, embattled president James Ramsey resigned from U of L. Beshear’s legal challenge halted Bevin’s board, reinstating the original board. Shepherd’s ruling keeps that original board, led by Chair Larry Benz, in place. Benz refused to comment on the ruling.

In a joint statement, Acting President Neville Pinto said he looks forward to the situation being fully resolved.

“In the meantime, the University of Louisville continues in its commitment to providing high quality education to our students, conducting groundbreaking research and being engaged in the community we serve,”Pinto’s statement said.

While Shepherd’s ruling permanently bars Bevin’s board of trustees, Bevin’s office could still appeal the ruling. If Bevin appeals, SGA President Aaron Vance said he hopes the governor considers the how exceptional all board members are.

“In all of this however, 6 Board meetings later, with two very different boards have I been able to really see something that I hope the Governor will take into consideration as he looks into appealing the ruling, there were good people on his Board and there are good people on the current Board,” Vance’s statement said.

“All in all, I can definitively say that students want resolve. And I hope in lieu of another court case that maybe some compromise can be reached with the common goal of allowing this university to be able to focus on the things that really matter: our students, faculty, and staff.”

Regardless of legal dispute over Bevin’s hand-picked board, the issue of vacancies plague the current board. The board has five vacancies, two of which require necessary racial representation which former Governor Steve Beshear did not fill. University of Louisville Foundation Chair Brucie Moore asked Bevin fill these vacancies to help in the search for a new university president.

“At the very least, I encourage Governor Bevin to make those two appointments so the board of trustees can begin the critical business of searching for a new university president,” Moore’s statement said.

“Finding a new leader for U of L is too important to the campus community, city and commonwealth to be delayed.”

This story will be updated.

The post Bevin’s board permanently blocked appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
0
Kyeland Jackson <![CDATA[FAFSA deadline lurches forward]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=39174 2016-09-28T16:16:18Z 2016-09-28T15:38:14Z By Kyeland Jackson — If you considered procrastinating financial aid applications, think again. Applications next year’s Free Application for Federal Student Aid applications jumped forward to Oct. 1, awarding federal aid months earlier than last year. Because financial aid works on a “first come, first serve” basis, students expecting need-based aid now have less time to apply. Details of the federal […]

The post FAFSA deadline lurches forward appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
By Kyeland Jackson —

If you considered procrastinating financial aid applications, think again.

Applications next year’s Free Application for Federal Student Aid applications jumped forward to Oct. 1, awarding federal aid months earlier than last year. Because financial aid works on a “first come, first serve” basis, students expecting need-based aid now have less time to apply. Details of the federal change were discussed during a financial aid press conference Wednesday morning.

“If a kid waits until Jan. 1 to apply for those dollars this year, there’s a good chance that all of them will be gone,” Kentucky Lottery Senior Vice President of Communications Chip Polston said.

Financial Aid

Polston discusses financial aid in front of students

Last year nearly $100 million in scholarships and grants were awarded to almost 50,000 Kentucky students. This year the two need-based programs affected are the College Access Program and Kentucky Tuition Grants Program, which award eligible students up to $1900 and $3000 respectively.

“The FAFSA is your ticket to CAP and KTG, as well as work study and student loans,” Erin Klarer, vice president of government relations for Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority, said.

Sophomore Conrad Johnson, whose full tuition was paid by federal financial aid, described how FAFSA helped him attend college.

“Without financial aid that i received through doing FAFSA, among other things, I probably would not have been able to attend college,” Johnson said.

“It’s made it (college) affordable, it’s made me not have to worry about all of the stress of all of the debt that I would be taking otherwise. So personally I can completely attest to how helpful it’s been in achieving my goals in college.”

With dwindling state dollars appropriated to higher education, students have suffered financially. U of L approved increasing tuition rates by five percent, raising costs for students by up to $1,242 depending on residency status. That increase is offset by the Credit for Credits program, which reimburses students finishing 30 credit hours a year. University meal plan and housing rates increased as well. More budget cuts and rate increases were expected when Governor Matt Bevin announced he would cut higher education funding by two percent. But a judge overturned Bevin’s order, releasing $18 million back to universities.

For those who miss the FAFSA deadline, there are some options available. The Pell Grant, a federal financial grant, can award up to $5,815. The Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship is available as well. The scholarship awards students up to $1000 based on their grade point average and ACT score upon leaving high school.

Photos by Kyeland Jackson // The Louisville Cardinal

The post FAFSA deadline lurches forward appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
0
Kyeland Jackson <![CDATA[Kathleen Smith placed on leave]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=39150 2016-09-28T00:51:37Z 2016-09-28T00:51:37Z By Kyeland Jackson — University of Louisville Foundation Assistant Secretary Kathleen Smith was placed on paid leave Monday. Smith, who was employed with the university for over 40 years, was former university president James Ramsey’s chief of staff. ULF Chair Brucie Moore placed Smith on leave Monday, citing turbulent months for Smith and the foundation. “Upon further […]

The post Kathleen Smith placed on leave appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
By Kyeland Jackson —

University of Louisville Foundation Assistant Secretary Kathleen Smith was placed on paid leave Monday.

Smith, who was employed with the university for over 40 years, was former university president James Ramsey’s chief of staff. ULF Chair Brucie Moore placed Smith on leave Monday, citing turbulent months for Smith and the foundation.

“Upon further reflection, I am immediately placing you on a paid leave of absence until further notice,” Moore’s email to Smith said.

“You should therefore not come to the foundation’s office unless I, Dr. Pinto, or the new interim executive director specifically requests you to do so…we ask you be available to respond to any foundation related questions from me, Dr. Pinto, or the new interim executive director while on leave.”

Smith’s role change appeases one of U of L Board of Trustees Chair Larry Benz’s demands of the foundation. Demands included changing the foundation chair, terminating Ramsey’s ULF presidency, creation of a three-member audit nominating committee and forfeiture of documents on a $38 million loan. If demands are not satisfied, Benz and the university board threatened to sue the foundation.

Since the demands two weeks ago, all conditions have been met.

Ramsey resigned as foundation president, Bob Hughes stepped down as foundation chair and Smith resigned as U of L’s assistant secretary. Hughes, who was a vocal supporter of Ramsey during his university presidency, said he was not involved in the decision to put Smith on paid leave.

The foundation, who manages U of L’s $680 million endowment, has been in hot water the past year.

Payments towards Ramsey and Smith raised concerns for expenditures by ULF. In 2013 alone, Smith was paid $319,146 in compensations by ULF and related organizations. That does not include pay for her work as the foundation’s assistant secretary. Benz issued a statement on Smith’s paid leave.

“While I will not comment on any specific action, I can only emphasize that ULF and U of L Boards of Trustees are now working together very cooperatively and are 100% aligned for what is in the best interests of the University of Louisville,” Benz’s statement said.

 

Friday’s meeting continued ULF’s resolve towards transparency. The foundation created an executive director position to help preside over ULF, an audit oversight committee to begin the search for a nationally recognized auditing firm and the began discussion on the $38 million loan U of L made to the foundation.

Based on ULF’s progress, Benz said he may ask trustees to retract the threat of litigation during their next meeting.

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

The post Kathleen Smith placed on leave appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
0
Olivia Krauth <![CDATA[The housing boom: Are students satisfied?]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=39151 2016-09-28T18:16:52Z 2016-09-28T00:15:26Z By Olivia Krauth– With new off-campus housing options opening yearly, are students getting safe, affordable housing around U of L? The aesthetic of junior communication major Austin Browning’s cottage at The Retreat is best described as “frat boy.” A fraternity yard sign is visible from a second floor window. Louisville-themed cornhole boards – a Christmas […]

The post The housing boom: Are students satisfied? appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
By Olivia Krauth–

With new off-campus housing options opening yearly, are students getting safe, affordable housing around U of L?

The aesthetic of junior communication major Austin Browning’s cottage at The Retreat is best described as “frat boy.” A fraternity yard sign is visible from a second floor window. Louisville-themed cornhole boards – a Christmas gift from Browning’s mom – are propped against a back wall, fresh from tailgate. An American-themed flag bearing Browning’s fraternity letters hangs on the wall, one of few decorations in the living room.

Photo by Rachel Bunger / The Louisville Cardinal

Photo by Rachel Bunger / The Louisville Cardinal

Then there’s Brady, Browning’s five-month-old dog whom he calls the “frat hound.” One of Browning’s favorite parts of The Retreat are the amenities, both human and dog-friendly.

Brady, Browning's dog who lives with him at The Retreat. Photo by Rachel Bunger / The Louisville Cardinal

Brady, Browning’s dog who lives with him at The Retreat. Photo by Rachel Bunger / The Louisville Cardinal

“Guys come over and we go to the pool, we go to the gym, we play basketball here,” Browning said, fixing his hair underneath a U of L baseball cap. “It’s very dog-friendly – this is probably the most dog-friendly place. There are places to walk your dog like trails.”

At this point, the interview halts as Brady jumps on the coffee table, one of the few places at The Retreat he isn’t allowed to be.

The Retreat is one student housing option built near U of L in the past few years. The unaffiliated, student-focused collection of cottages joined affiliated and unaffiliated apartment complexes in the fight for students’ rent money in 2015. Since, another affiliated option – The Nine – and a hybrid complex – University Pointe – have opened.

With freshmen required to live on-campus, upperclassmen are often sent to off-campus housing – houses and apartments in surrounding neighborhoods, unaffiliated apartment complexes and affiliated apartment complexes.

U of L Director of Campus Housing Julie Weber explained the four types of U of L-tied student housing. Two options – housing and residential life buildings and ULH Inc. – are on U of L property. The third is University Pointe, which is managed by a third party but is leasing U of L land and abides by more U of L rules than affiliates. The fourth option is affiliated housing – off-campus privately owned options. Some options, like The Retreat, aren’t tied to U of L but house predominantly U of L students.

After four new off-campus student housing options added 2,455 beds in three years, 2016 is the first year without a new project. Has the housing boom halted?

According to two Cardinal surveys in 2015 and 2016, student opinion towards off-campus housing options is slowly shifting. While students find the options unaffordable, they’re more likely to like where they’re living.

In 2015, 61 percent of respondents said they didn’t think options were affordable for students, who typically pay rent on their own. A year later, results are closer – 37 percent say it isn’t worth the money, while 47 percent say it is worth the cost.

screen-shot-2016-09-27-at-8-02-22-pm

“To me, it was worth it,” Browning said. “What they offer and how much it was actually going to cost to live here seemed a lot more cost efficient than some places.”

Browning pays $635 per month for his share of a three bedroom, three bathroom cottage – a total of $1,905 for the unit.

Most student options are inclusive, so electricity and other bills are covered in the rent – a difference from many off-campus apartments and houses. According to U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s 2015 statistics, the fair market rent for a two-bedroom apartment in the 40208 zip code is $670 before bills.

“I came from a place that was not furnished and I had to pay my own electric bills,” senior public health major Tiffany Chea said. “Since The Clubhouse covers it, I don’t mind paying more than I have in the past.”

Weber said options are market-driven, typically means lower rent prices. “They’re all outbidding each other in a good direction for students, which is down,” she said.

Senior marketing major Kayla Glisson said her rent at The Arch was “pretty high last year,” but dropped $70 when she renewed her lease. “It’s all inclusive, so I’m satisfied with the amount.”

Not all students are benefiting from a price drop. A Cardinal Towne resident, who requested anonymity, said their rate went up when they renewed because they were given a special rate for moving in mid-year.

“We’ve been able to maintain our lease rates in this competitive market,” JT Stinnett, The Retreat’s community manager said. The cottages we offer are very popular with students because it combines apartment living in a structure that feels more like a home. When you add that feature, which is unique to the market, with our prime location and superior amenities package, it has meant consistent renewal rates and high demand at The Retreat.”

In 2015, 65 percent of respondents would move to a cheaper place with fewer amenities. Now, only half would move. 

Housing options use a variety of amenities – onsite gyms, Bluetooth-equipped showerheads, golf simulators – to attract potential residents. U of L even boasts about the upscale options as a way to attract students. The university posted a U of L-made video showing The Nine and University Pointe to their social media pages on Sept. 26, showing the courtyards and pool decks of both options.

“Housing has become a key element in the recruiting process,” Weber said in the video.

The flood of new properties and amenities isn’t just being felt by students – property managers are feeling the impact, too.

“Students are constantly bombarded with shiny new ads and amenities and features but are not doing their research to find out the best value or the best service,” The Bellamy’s property manager Craig Haughton said in an email. “It doesn’t matter if you have the newest apartment with the Bluetooth shower head if you can’t get anything fixed, are not safe or have horrible service.”

While appreciated by some residents, these amenities can drive up the rent. Both years, amenities available was not one of the things students considered the most when choosing a housing option. The top two? Rent price and proximity to campus.

In 2015, 57 percent of respondents lived in affiliated housing – The Province, The Bellamy, Cardinal Towne, The Arch and The Clubhouse. In 2016, that number dropped to 40 percent, despite The Nine opening in fall 2016.

screen-shot-2016-09-27-at-8-02-16-pm

The average occupancy of the affiliated options and The Retreat for spring 2016 is 84 percent. The Province saw the highest occupancy rate, with 96 percent of its 858 beds filled. The Retreat and The Arch fell below average figures with 76 and 68 percent occupancies, respectively.

The occupancy rates do not necessarily show how many students are living there. Weber said the properties reserve 75 percent of the rooms for U of L students, with the rest available for non-students. Students must be placed on different floors than non-students, and Weber needs to give written permission if a student and non-student want to room together.

screen-shot-2016-09-27-at-8-05-03-pm

If current options are seeing increased competition and students aren’t increasingly choosing to live in them, why do developers still consider U of L?

A 650-bed project called “The Village,” slated to be on the corner of Brook and Bloom Streets near Taco Bell, was announced to the U of L Foundation in spring 2014. U of L spokesperson John Karman said the project is now on hold so its owner, American Campus Communities, can look at market conditions.

“It’s on them to do a market study and determine if their investment dollar is going to be well-served by building next to the University of Louisville,” Weber said of developers.

“Right now, we’re a little cautious because we have so much high-end housing around the campus we make sure that we’re staying in the right position in terms of number of affiliates,” Weber said. Weber said she doesn’t forsee more affiliates because there’s no available land around U of L.

To become affiliated, properties approach U of L to create an affiliation agreement, which outlines minimum unit standards (bedrooms, semi-private or private bathrooms), permits and insurance requirements.

“The biggest benefit for the apartment complexes is that they get official access to our students,” Weber said. Affiliated properties can officially market on campus, and receive student and parent contact information.

“The affiliation agreement is partially a financial agreement,” Weber said. “The complex has to pay us a fee basically for the privilege of using the U of L name and using U of L as part of their branding.”

This fee is different for each affiliated property. Some change due to inflation, and some have built-in increases. The 2016 median fee is around $53,000, with The Clubhouse paying the most at $151,600 this year.

screen-shot-2016-09-27-at-8-05-08-pm

“The fee structure was different when we started the affiliation process, so each one is a little bit different depending on when they signed,” Weber said. Older affiliates like The Province and The Bellamy have lower fees than newer options, who are subject to new affiliation rules from the U of L Foundation and whose agreements include U of L Police coverage.  

Cardinal Towne, The Clubhouse, The Arch, The Province and The Nine have ULPD coverage. The Bellamy does not, opting for outside security. ULPD performs routine patrols of the grounds, responds to law enforcement calls and investigates crimes on the property.

Residents have mixed opinions of how safe their apartments are. One 2015 survey respondent said it seems there is “zero security” at The Arch, but Glisson said The Arch’s layout made her feel safe and led her to live there. The Arch did not respond to comment about their security efforts.

Three different 2016 responders – two at The Retreat and one at The Province – said there were non-residents around their apartments, making them feel unsafe. In Oct. 2015, three students were assaulted at The Retreat after 10 to 20 people jumped the back fence.

Browning said The Retreat has calmed down from last year, when ULPD said a lot of safety concerns were “mostly just parties that got out of control,” ULPD Assistant Chief Kenny Brown told The Cardinal in January. Stinnett said The Retreat’s security efforts include gates, security cameras, two LMPD courtesy officers who live there and security patrols each night. 

“We like to keep our residents educated about their safety by sharing tips and safety videos via social media and Constant Contact, host community events so residents can get to know their neighbors and we’ll distribute community-wide safety alerts when/if the situation warrants,” Stinnett said.

The affiliated properties have seen 20 crime reports between Aug. 1 and Sept. 26. The Arch had six reports, including one for sexual abuse. The Province and Cardinal Towne each saw five. The Clubhouse had three, and The Nine had one – an assault report. The Bellamy and The Retreat use outside security, so their crimes do not appear in ULPD logs.

Outside of safety, the agreements guide how properties treat residents and facilities. The properties are required to report student issues to U of L each term. Lease violations, violent behavior, theft or vandalism are all subject to being reported.

On the facilities side, the property must “manage the facility needs of the community,” and let U of L know if a major facility issue arises. The agreements don’t specify what constitutes a “significant facility issue.”

Each agreement requires maintenance requests to be tended to within two business days and 24/7 immediate response to “emergency facility issues to minimally prevent extended damage or potential hazardous condition to individuals.”

Both years, residents complained about attention to maintenance requests and general property maintenance.

“Maintenance probably doesn’t even know that they are maintenance seeing as how it takes weeks to fix something. The hallways are trashed and it even smells where people do not clean their vomit or after their pets,” one Arch resident said in the 2015 survey.

A Cardinal Towne resident said maintenance requests used to take three to five days, but they’re improving. “They just hired a new maintenance guy who kills it,” the resident said, adding it now takes under 48 hours to get something fixed. A representative from Cardinal Towne did not respond to calls regarding their maintenance efforts.

Glisson’s roommates found black mold in one of the rooms due to a leaking HVAC unit.

“The staff was trying to be accommodating and they kept their cool and remained calm while working with us. However, they gave use less than 24 hours to move our stuff. We got the new keys at 8 p.m. on a Friday and had to return the old keys by 5 p.m. the next day. So we were up until 5 in the morning moving our stuff.”

Glisson said the process from finding the mold to switching units lasted about three months, and hasn’t had any issues since.

“The staff has followed up with us and always asks us if everything is good with the apartment now,” Glisson said. “But it also sucks that we had to move, because the whole reason we renewed our lease was so that we didn’t have to move.”

The agreements tie responsibility for student concerns to both the property management and the university. “The university will work in good faith with the owner to resolve concerns, respond to inquiries promptly and seek to balance a quality experience for all residents,” the agreements say.

“Our name and our logo is on their stuff and that’s not just a courtesy. That means we have some obligation to look out for our students,” Weber said.

Glisson said despite the three-month process of dealing with mold, she never reported the issue to U of L. Weber hopes to change communication to improve affiliated housing and the students’ view of it.

“When they have things like, ‘I need to break my lease and I’m not getting anywhere with the management of my affiliate,’ I want them to come to us,” Weber said. “Saying the conditions aren’t OK, maintenance isn’t happening – they can’t keep their affiliate status if they’re not serving our students well. And we have a lot of work to do.”

Graphics by Mitchell Howes / The Louisville Cardinal

Photos by Rachel Bunger / The Louisville Cardinal

The post The housing boom: Are students satisfied? appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
0
Phillip Lentsch <![CDATA[U of L hosts presidential debate watch party]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=39123 2016-09-28T01:39:07Z 2016-09-27T17:29:45Z By Zachary June– The Sept. 26 presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump gathered large amounts of University of Louisville students to Ekstrom Library, with not one empty seat in the Chao Auditorium. Sponsored by the U of L Student Activities Board, the debate watch party attracted both Democratic and Republican supporters – although […]

The post U of L hosts presidential debate watch party appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
By Zachary June–

The Sept. 26 presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump gathered large amounts of University of Louisville students to Ekstrom Library, with not one empty seat in the Chao Auditorium.

Sponsored by the U of L Student Activities Board, the debate watch party attracted both Democratic and Republican supporters – although a clear majority of the students present were pulling for Clinton.

“I’m not a big fan of Hillary, but I think she did a better job explaining what she’ll do,” U of L senior Raquel Resendiz said.

Sidney Cobb – a U of L sophomore and vice chair of the SAB engaging issues committee – was adamant about organizing the watch party due to the lack of voter engagement on U of L’s campus.

“We decided to host a debate watch because I feel as though there is a stigma that college students are apathetic and disengaged,” Cobb said. “However, I don’t think that is true. I know many students who are passionate about political issues, so this watch party is a good chance to educate students on each candidate’s stances.”

Jonathan Fuller, chair of the engaging issues committee, echoed Cobb’s sentiments.

“I did it so students could be informed,” Fuller said. Fuller initially planned on hosting a debate with student campaign surrogates from both parties, but was unable to find a campus group that supported Trump.

The debate was well-received by students. Many feel as though it gave them the opportunity to get a firsthand glimpse at both Clinton and Trump’s presidential styles.

“I think the event itself was well-advocated for,” U of L freshman Alex McGrath said. “It’s very important that the university hosts political-geared events so that they can develop interest in the political process, because many college students don’t. The free pizza did wonders to draw in students.”

“I decided to come because this is my first chance to vote, and I want to be well-informed on the candidates before making a decision,” U of L freshman Daniel Bird said. “The increase of social media allows younger people to be more involved in politics, but the information they receive is often biased. Being a registered Democrat, I tried to focus on the legitimacy of both candidate’s policies before blindly voting Clinton.”

Overall, the event was a success of both attendance and influence. Those present fulfilled their civic duty as members of a democratic nation. Millennial voters will have more of an influence in this election than ever before; therefore, it’s important that all students are informed, registered and present to vote.

The post U of L hosts presidential debate watch party appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
0
Phillip Lentsch <![CDATA[U of L opens the Teaching Innovation Learning Lab]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=39121 2016-09-28T01:40:54Z 2016-09-27T16:48:16Z By Jerad Godsave– The third floor of Ekstrom Library was bustling with students and faculty on Sept. 26, as the grand opening of the Teaching Innovation Learning Lab (TILL) signaled another construction completion on the University of Louisville’s campus. Many high-profile U of L faculty – including Acting President Neville Pinto and Acting Provost Dale […]

The post U of L opens the Teaching Innovation Learning Lab appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
By Jerad Godsave–

The third floor of Ekstrom Library was bustling with students and faculty on Sept. 26, as the grand opening of the Teaching Innovation Learning Lab (TILL) signaled another construction completion on the University of Louisville’s campus.

Many high-profile U of L faculty – including Acting President Neville Pinto and Acting Provost Dale Billingsley – were present. Three simultaneous cuts to the ribbon stretched across the entrance of the TILL were made by Pinto, Billingsley and Associate Provost Gale Rhodes, signaling in a new period of higher learning for Ekstrom.

The university has seen its fair share of bad press amid accreditation whispers, allegations and investigations. With the TILL’s opening, U of L hopes to move in a new direction focused on academics rather than scandals.

Dr. Alan Attaway, Interim Dean of the School of Business, said that he expects the TILL to provide a new approach to academic pedagogy, collaboration and engagement.

“Clearly, we need different kinds of classrooms and different utilization of space that we have now, because things that you would like to try you cannot in a tiered, fixed classroom,” Attaway said. “Reconfiguring the classroom gives the student more access to learning opportunities.”

The TILL also provides many new technologies available for students and faculty, including:

  • Student microphones (Catch Box Pro)
  • Ceiling-mounted speakers
  • Wireless presentation and collaboration systems at tables for students to display and share content
  • Wall-mounted cameras with ability to record classes for evaluation, review and training
  • Wi-Fi and hard-wired data ports

The TILL will also be equipped with one or more of the following notable construction designs as well:

  • No “front-of-room” orientation
  • Flexible and highly configurable furniture
  • Multiple points of projection via flat panel video wall displays and projection screen

Some of the U of L faculty present spoke on how the process of learning in a classroom is often one-sided, with the students receiving and internalizing information from the professor. The TILL’s collaborative approach, according to Pinto, is more interactive.

“It’s important to engage students in the learning process, and one of the best ways to engage them is through collaboration,” Pinto said.

The post U of L opens the Teaching Innovation Learning Lab appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
0
Kyeland Jackson <![CDATA[Firetrucks respond to student concern]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=39115 2016-09-26T19:29:01Z 2016-09-26T19:29:01Z By Kyeland Jackson — A swarm of firefighters and officials converged outside of the chemistry building Monday afternoon. Four firetrucks, one ambulance and hazmat vehicle and around 20 firefighters, geared with oxygen tanks, responded to the call. The officials reportedly responded to concerns for a student in the building. University of Louisville spokesperson John Drees said the […]

The post Firetrucks respond to student concern appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
By Kyeland Jackson —

A swarm of firefighters and officials converged outside of the chemistry building Monday afternoon.

Four firetrucks, one ambulance and hazmat vehicle and around 20 firefighters, geared with oxygen tanks, responded to the call. The officials reportedly responded to concerns for a student in the building. University of Louisville spokesperson John Drees said the student reported feeling lightheaded, prompting the call for emergency personnel.

Asked about the swarms of personnel called, one firefighter said it’s normal for calls to “overshoot” the response to situations. However, he admitted responses are not usually this drastic.

“It’s not often it happens,” the firefighter said.

Firefighers near chemical building

Firefighters gather to discuss outside of the chemistry building

Drees said it was possibly due to a lapse in communication.

Coordination between Louisville Metro Police and University of Louisville Police raised concern for communications last week, after reports of suspects arrested in connection to sexual assaults near the university were delayed. ULPD Lt. Col. Kenny Brown said the departments will work to streamline communications.

Photos by Kyeland Jackson // The Louisville Cardinal

The post Firetrucks respond to student concern appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
0
Phillip Lentsch <![CDATA[U of L creates a Quality Enhancement Plan]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=39087 2016-09-26T16:26:41Z 2016-09-26T16:26:41Z By Tyler Hudson– U of L will soon be under review by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACSCOC) for the renewal of the university’s accreditation. As a part of this accreditation process, which will begin in early spring 2017, the university is required to create a Quality Enhancement Plan. The committee charged with […]

The post U of L creates a Quality Enhancement Plan appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
By Tyler Hudson–

U of L will soon be under review by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACSCOC) for the renewal of the university’s accreditation.

As a part of this accreditation process, which will begin in early spring 2017, the university is required to create a Quality Enhancement Plan. The committee charged with putting this plan together began meeting in 2015 to develop a plan that is specifically targeted at second year students transitioning into their third year.

UofL’s 2017 QEP is titled “Find Your Fit in the Second Year: Inquire, Explore, Discover.” This plan is aiming to guide undeclared students in the right career or major path.

According to U of L’s QEP website, “The second year is a crossroads at which many students struggle with indecision around their academic major and career choice.” This can lead to dissatisfaction with, and ultimately disengagement, from academic life.

Patty Payette, co-chair of the QEP committee, says that the reason U of L loses many exploratory second year students is due to a lack of direction.

“Many students can’t figure out how to use their education after college which leaves them wondering why they’re here in the first place.” In theory, the program will serve these students, and help guide them towards a suitable major or career path.

In an email to the U of L community, Acting Provost Dale Billingsley says that this program “develops and pilots a three-credit, inquiry-guided seminar to deepen core academic skills and align second-year students’ choice of major, career plans and personal strengths.”

According to Payette, “Find your Fit” will not only be a class, but students will also be matched with career advisors. These advisors will be able to help students find a possible career path or major, and they will also advise students on an academic level. The course will be offered through the department of counseling and human development. Curriculum is still in the early stages of development, but it seems as if the program will be available as early as 2018, which means current freshmen will be the target audience.

Because QEP is so heavily focused on students, Payette says that student involvement is a necessity.

“There are many ways to get involved in this process of developing the QEP,” Payette said.

Currently, there are three different focus groups planned this fall semester for students who have been through their second year to talk about various experiences dealing with finding the right path as an exploratory student.

There will also be a monthly student advisory group starting late September that will deal with more of the specifics when it comes to shaping the QEP.

“We want to hear experiences of students who have been there so we can tailor the QEP to those who know what it’s like,” Payette said.

If you have any questions about the QEP or how you can get involved, go to uofl.me/QEP2017.

List of Dates for Focus Groups/Events centered around QEP

QEP Focus Groups (For Students Who Have Already Completed Their Second Year)

 Friday, September 30, 2016 11:30 – 1:00 pm, Cultural Center, Multipurpose Room

 Thursday, October 20, 2016 6:00 – 7:30 pm, Cultural Center, Multipurpose Room

 Wednesday, November 16, 2016 12:00 – 1:30 pm, Cultural Center, Multipurpose Room

Find Your Fit Student Advisory Meetings (Open to Anyone)

 Friday, September 30, 2016 1:00 -2:00 pm, Ekstrom Library room, Delphi Center Lab room 244

 Friday, October 21, 2016 1:00 – 2:00 pm, Ekstrom Library room, Delphi Center Lab room 244

 Friday, November 4, 2016 1:00 – 2:00 pm, Ekstrom Library room, Delphi Center Lab room 244

 Friday, December 2, 2016 1:00 – 2:00 pm, Ekstrom Library room, Delphi Center Lab room 244

RSVP Necessary: Email QEP2017@louisville.edu

The post U of L creates a Quality Enhancement Plan appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
0
Phillip Lentsch <![CDATA[AAUP discusses search for new university president]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=39066 2016-09-26T16:52:12Z 2016-09-26T16:14:48Z By Jerad Godsave– The ongoing search for a permanent university president is the main priority for the University of Louisville chapter of the American Association of University Professors. At the meeting on Sept. 23, the chapter discussed a survey conducted internally among AAUP members to evaluate criteria for selecting the president position. This job analysis […]

The post AAUP discusses search for new university president appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
By Jerad Godsave–

The ongoing search for a permanent university president is the main priority for the University of Louisville chapter of the American Association of University Professors.

At the meeting on Sept. 23, the chapter discussed a survey conducted internally among AAUP members to evaluate criteria for selecting the president position. This job analysis considers 20 dimensions used to evaluate and characterize administrative jobs used by the National Association of AAUP. The U of L chapter has added six additional criteria. These additional criteria were adapted from qualification areas used by Duke, Iowa, and ExComm input. The survey requires members to assign desirability to each quality ranking from negative to positive. The dimensions are based on the ‘Five Factor Model’ of personality.

The survey is a solution from a request by the faculty senate to provide feedback on the president selection. The hope of the AAUP is to have an internal survey by members first, a faculty senate survey second, the entire faculty third and eventually incorporate the student body into the conversation. There’s some disagreement among AAUP members concerning the evaluation methodology used to rank a candidate for the office. The AAUP executive committee proposed this survey methodology in order to influence the board of trustees who select the candidate.

Avery Kolers is president of the U of L AAUP chapter.

“As of now, the board is not able to appoint a candidate for the office,” Kolers said during the meeting.

A chief goal of AAUP members is to strive for transparency at the institution. That goal is echoed by Koler’s thoughts when asked how confident he is about the task of a university president position being filled by a suitable replacement.

“I think if the university is independent of the governor’s political whims, the president of U of L is a great job for an academic leader. If the university is under the governor’s thumb, then nobody in their right mind would want the job.”

The post AAUP discusses search for new university president appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

]]>
0