The Louisville Cardinal U of L's Independent Student Newspaper 2017-07-22T03:49:47Z http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/feed/atom/ WordPress http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/media/2016/05/cropped-lc-logo-1-32x32.png Shelby Brown <![CDATA[Five staff positions cut from advancement department]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=49323 2017-07-22T00:47:19Z 2017-07-21T23:58:42Z By Shelby Brown– U of L last week cut five employees from its fundraising department, even as gifts to academic programs plummeted 25 percent in the past year. Insider Louisville first reported the terminations. Donations to U of L shrank from $84 million to $63 million. The outgoing vice president of advancement called the $21 million […]

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By Shelby Brown–

U of L last week cut five employees from its fundraising department, even as gifts to academic programs plummeted 25 percent in the past year. Insider Louisville first reported the terminations. Donations to U of L shrank from $84 million to $63 million. The outgoing vice president of advancement called the $21 million drop the worst he had seen.

Inman said overall funds are down $97 million, blaming NCAA scandal, poor university publicity and foundation governance.

“(It’s) part of ongoing university belt-tightening related to the budget shortfall,” director of media relations John Karman said. Through the reduction in force, U of L’s advancement department lost six percent of its 76 employees.

The advancement cuts happened before the U of L Foundation’s July 18 meeting, when the vice president of advancement, Keith Inman, presented the stark reduction. He said while gifts from small donors show an uptick, large donations have sharply declined.

Donor relations have been a hot topic in meetings going back to spring. Philanthropists were shying away from U of L long before the foundation’s forensic audit rocked the university June 5. In May, the U of L Foundation’s chief operating officer was optimistic donations would rise after the audit release.

With former university and foundation president James Ramsey and his team now ousted, Inman says foundation directors must highlight U of L’s successes and overarching vision despite negative publicity. Inman said wealthy foundation members and trustees should lead the way by donating significant gifts to the university.

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Kyeland Jackson <![CDATA[Effigy dressed in black found fastened to tree branch on campus]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=49325 2017-07-21T23:19:34Z 2017-07-21T22:43:34Z By Kyeland Jackson — U of L employees found an effigy dressed in all black fastened to a tree branch in Stansbury Park, across the street from the Kent School of Social Work, Thursday. University spokesperson John Karman said the effigy was not hung from a the tree by a noose, but said it was […]

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By Kyeland Jackson —

U of L employees found an effigy dressed in all black fastened to a tree branch in Stansbury Park, across the street from the Kent School of Social Work, Thursday.

University spokesperson John Karman said the effigy was not hung from a the tree by a noose, but said it was “fastened to a branch in some way.” Karman said university police are investigating.

“It’s not considered a hate crime because no crime was committed,” Karman said when asked if a criminal investigation was underway. “Police removed the effigy. They’re trying to find out more about it.”

effigy

The effigy found fastened to a tree in Stansbury Park.

In a blasted email, Interim President Greg Postel said the effigy was a headless Halloween decoration which some interpreted as a racist message. Others, he said, thought it was a prank. Citing initiatives like the LGBTQ center and cultural center, Postel said the incident is a chance to reflect on U of L’s values.

“We support these initiatives because it’s the right thing to do. And we do it because this is what we want to be: a compassionate, supportive, welcoming community in which we appreciate what makes us individually unique and learn from each other,” Postel said in the email. “Regardless of its intent, this week’s incident reminds us that we, as a campus, must remain vigilant in building that community.”

Earlier this year, the Kent school’s “Black Lives Matter” banner was reportedly stolen from the building’s front. The banner was found across the street the next morning with its ties, which were fastened to the second-floor balcony, cut.

This story will be updated.

Effigy Photo Courtesy / The Univeristy of Louisville

File Photo / The Louisville Cardinal

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Kyeland Jackson <![CDATA[Postel appoints three new officers, filling vacancies]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=49315 2017-07-21T23:56:08Z 2017-07-21T14:08:26Z By Kyeland Jackson — Interim President Greg Postel replaced three retiring or resigning administrators Thursday, filling gaps in U of L’s senior leadership. Postel welcomed the appointees in an emailed statement Friday. “I am confident that, with this new leadership in place, our university will not skip a beat in these areas as we continue […]

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By Kyeland Jackson —

Interim President Greg Postel replaced three retiring or resigning administrators Thursday, filling gaps in U of L’s senior leadership.

Postel welcomed the appointees in an emailed statement Friday.

“I am confident that, with this new leadership in place, our university will not skip a beat in these areas as we continue to pursue our future as one of America’s leading metropolitan research universities,” Postel said.

VP For Community Engagement

Ralph Fitzpatrick will be interim vice president for community engagement, spearheading U of L’s community partnerships. In a blasted email, Postel said Fitzpatrick has more than 40 years of service to U of L which includes time as the associate vice president for community engagement. Fitzpatrick also served as Simmons College’s provost and senior executive vice president between 2012 and 2014.

Fitzpatrick replaces replaces Dan Hall, who retired June 30 after serving U of L 31 years.

VP For University Advancement

Bryan Robinson will step into the position of interim vice president for university advancement. He replaces Keith Inman, who accepted a role as Kosair Charities’ president.  Robinson, currently the senior assistant vice president for development,worked as a director of development for U of L in 2008. He returned to permanently work at the university in 2013 after helping a multi-billion dollar campaign at Indiana University. He’s set to graduate from Bellarmine University with a doctorate in higher education administration.

Robinson will begin his job Aug. 1.

Associate VP for Human Resources

John Elliot will be U of L’s interim associate vice president for human resources, replacing Jeanell Hughes. Elliot was a director of recruitment services and interim vice president for human resources at Dartmouth-Hithcock — a research and healthcare delivery system in New Hampshire. Elliot brings more than 20 years of human resources experience.

Hughes has accepted a position with Aramark, the same food service company that operates all U of L restaurants. Elliot will begin July 22.

Though the spots are filled, U of L will search for permanent hires for the three positions. Interim appointments wrought speculation by U of L’s accrediting body — the Southern Association of Schools and Colleges. Citing seven interim administrators leading U of L, SACS said July 5 the university may have commited two more violations. U of L has possibly violated nine SACS accreditation standards.

Postel and U of L Board of Trustees Chair David Grissom will visit SACS in August. A SACS special committee will visit and review the university’s efforts to comply with accreditation standards Sept. 19 – 21.

File Photo / The Louisville Cardinal

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Kyeland Jackson <![CDATA[“Dunkirk”a tour de force war movie]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=49311 2017-07-22T03:49:47Z 2017-07-21T02:17:53Z By Kyeland Jackson — I walked out of the IMAX theater for “Dunkirk” and didn’t know what to think. Was “Dunkirk” amazing? Was it only alright? But as I’ve recounted the movie, the experience which was that movie, it’s clear Christopher Nolan has directed another gem. His movie is unlike other war films, such as […]

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By Kyeland Jackson —

I walked out of the IMAX theater for “Dunkirk” and didn’t know what to think. Was “Dunkirk” amazing? Was it only alright? But as I’ve recounted the movie, the experience which was that movie, it’s clear Christopher Nolan has directed another gem.

His movie is unlike other war films, such as “Saving Private Ryan,” “Apocalpyse Now” or 2016’s “Hacksaw Ridge.” Nolan shuns the archetype of the gory, explosion-packed movie to his benefit, succeeding through a compelling plot, characters, score, cinematography and theme.

Plot

The plot describes the World War II battle of Dunkirk, France. There, hundreds of thousands of allied troops were stranded by German forces. We follow Tommy, Mr. Dawson and Collins who fight for survival on the land, sea and air respectively. Their stories intertwine as they try to survive deadly assaults and try to maintain some hope. Often, their hopes are dashed.

Through the varying perspectives, audiences earn an rounded perspective in “Dunkirk.” Seeing the battle through the land, sea and air lends an invaluable perspective to how the battle rages from differing fronts. Their backgrounds are irrelevant, their names — even less so. By focusing on each terrifying moment, the audience realizes that information doesn’t matter. Through focusing on each moment, the audience is dropped into the fray, like these soldiers, to realize only survival matters.

Characters

The movie’s characters are made purposefully vague, and it works to Nolans’ benefit. We don’t learn much past their first names. Some, like Murphy’s character, give no name. Instead, we learn all we need from acting. Fionne Whitehead, Damien Bonnard, Mark Rylance, Tom Hardy and Jack Lowden portray central characters in arguably the hardest way: with little to no words.

The shock, terror, hope and apathy to death is acted clearly with their faces and sparse words. It’s hard to portray emotion without words. Harder when the role is your Hollywood debut, as it was for Whitehead who plays a main role as Tommy.

But they did it, and they did it well.

Score

Hans Zimmer is renowned as an accomplished film composers. That’s for good reason, as Zimmer’s score for the film evokes the despair and tension laid bare through the plot. Droning organ noises, screeching keys and deep chords grip you. Meanwhile, ticking noises keep the tension high and you on edge. Zimmer has excelled in scores, succeeding in the Nolan’s “Batman” films, “Interstellar” and “The Lion King.” He does it again with “Dunkirk,” catching the movie’s theme and accentuating it to resonate with audiences.

Camera

This is the first time I’ve included cameras to judge a movie, but Nolan’s use of cameras lends to the experience. The camera’s shot composition place audiences in the movie, mounting them at planes’ controls, in ships’ depths or on the sands of a beach being bombed. The dizzying camera throws you into the aggravation, terror and disorientation of the battle, and I love it.

Experience

“Dunkirk’s” pacing is disorienting, perhaps purposefully so. Rather than a linear story, timelines jump back and forth to cross and weave together. The story keeps audiences on edge from the beginning and accentuates their dread with booming sound effects, Zimmer’s tense score, dizzying camera shots and masterful acting throughout. That tension and despair envelops audiences throughout the film and keeps them there.

It’s a film you must see in IMAX to experience. Not just because the screen is bigger; Nolan shot more than half of the film through IMAX cameras, used authentic and replica planes and boats in filming and filmed where the battle of Dunkirk happened. IMAX viewing is a necessity for the full experience.

“Dunkirk” isn’t the action movie you’re expecting. But it’s nothing short of brilliant, using intimate storytelling, masterful acting and genius cinematography. It deserves to be listed among war movie greats and Nolan deserves an Oscar.

I plan to see “Dunkirk” in IMAX again soon. You should do the same.

TLC Rating: 10/10

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Shelby Brown <![CDATA[U of L approves revised Yum! lease after tense discussion]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=49305 2017-07-21T02:07:17Z 2017-07-21T02:07:17Z By Shelby Brown– U of L’s board of trustees heatedly debated the reworked KFC Yum! Center lease agreement before it passed 7-2 with four abstentions, one being John Schnatter. The revised lease agreement asks U of L pitch in to pay off arena debts. Seat sales at the arena aren’t generating enough money to cover the payments, which are […]

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By Shelby Brown–

U of L’s board of trustees heatedly debated the reworked KFC Yum! Center lease agreement before it passed 7-2 with four abstentions, one being John Schnatter.

The revised lease agreement asks U of L pitch in to pay off arena debts. Seat sales at the arena aren’t generating enough money to cover the payments, which are due in 2019. Despite ULAA and the Louisville Arena Authority passing the revised lease, trustees’ uncertainty nearly tabled the deal.

“This was set up to be doomed from day one,” Schnatter said, referring to the original lease agreement, via video conference. Schnatter and other trustees said the past could repeat, eventually forcing U of L to pay more.

When asked what his ideal solution would be, Athletic Director Tom Jurich said he would sell the Yum! Center.

The Yum! Center was financed in 2007 before the economy crashed. With that downturn, the arena’s projections for tax increment financing (TIF) fell short. Attorney Mike Herrington said future TIF projections must be more realistic.

Trustee Nitin Sahney said there’s no assurance Herrington’s numbers will work out.

“I think this is a bad deal. I think we’ve been put into a very bad situation and I think there’s no assurance this will get solved in the future,” Sahney said. “Here we are counting pennies for the university and the staff and everyone else. It’s not the $2.4 million a year, it’s the term of the lease and that accounts for a lot of money.”

Trustees eventually passed the revised lease when reminded of it is time-sensitive nature.


Trustees publicly disclosed conflicts of interest before board agenda items were addressed. Trustees Bonita Black and Jim Rogers recused themselves from the arena agreement vote, saying they worked on the arena.

Last week the ad hoc committee for board governance met to revisit the university’s conflict of interest policy.

“We’re excited about doing some updates and keeping the university on solid footing in that regard,” Black said.

In SAC’s latest letter, the investigation’s scope widened to include conflicts of interest. U of L currently faces up to nine possible violations.

In an effort to be in compliance, trustees must attend six hours of training in fiduciary responsibility. Fiduciary responsibility involves stewardship over funds, namely between beneficiaries and trustees. Black says SACS looks for independence in trustees, making sure they’re without “undue influence.”

Postel said U of L is in the process of completing reports to send to SACS, nine reports are due, two of those by the end of July. Postel and Board Chair David Grissom will travel to Atlanta in August to touch base with SACS before the September site visit. U of L will receive a report after the September visit the following month and will have the opportunity to respond before the final decision is made in December.

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Shelby Brown <![CDATA[Tensions mount over arena lease agreement]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=49294 2017-07-22T00:00:47Z 2017-07-20T16:34:10Z By Shelby Brown– U of L athletics has agreed to pay an additional $2.4 million yearly to lease the KFC Yum! Center. The agreement will be reviewed and possibly approved by both the university’s board of trustees and Yum! arena’s board. They meet at 1 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. respectively. The extra payment will help cover […]

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By Shelby Brown–

U of L athletics has agreed to pay an additional $2.4 million yearly to lease the KFC Yum! Center. The agreement will be reviewed and possibly approved by both the university’s board of trustees and Yum! arena’s board. They meet at 1 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. respectively.

The extra payment will help cover the arena’s bond debt, according to attorney Mike Herrington. The $2.4 million payment adds to athletics’ existing $1.3 million yearly payment. That means by 2047 U of L will have paid $75 million extra to the arena.

The added costs made for an uncomfortable U of L Athletic Association meeting, but the board approved the new lease agreement.

Interim President Greg Postel said how the athletics will pay the extra sum is a matter internal discussion. The agreement cites a possible $2 to $8 surcharge on men’s basketball tickets.

“I don’t want anyone to think that I feel that the amount of money we’re putting in is by any means affordable — it’s not. It’s a stretch,” Postel said.

Athletic Director Tom Jurich supported the agreement and mentioned possibly charging spectators for events that were previously free. Per Jurich, towards the end of the meeting, Postel said there would be no further discussion on the lease agreement, stating the university paid its fair share as the Yum! center’s tenant.

Though he said little in Thursday’s meeting, Jurich claims he had enough say in the negotiations.

While many stayed silent, some ULAA members opposed to the new lease. Former university board chair Larry Benz said if U of L was an NBA team, they would’ve left town.

“I find if extremely disheartening that we get punished for success. U of L athletics has lived up to every aspect of the good faith agreement, exceeded all of it’s conduct commitments and promises on that agreement. And what are we guilty of? Success,” Benz said. “I’m going to support this, but very, very begrudgingly.”

Benz praised Postel for rescuing the lease agreement,  which he called a “failed economic initiative.”

While the floor was open for questions, Eric Berson asked for assurance U of L wouldn’t be stuck with ULAA’s extra obligation. Jurich said he hopes the university helps athletics.

“I sure hope we’re not, as an athletics department, stuck together hanging on to all of this, because that isn’t fair,” Jurich said. “I keep hearing that the university (is) one family, I hope that is true.”

The arena was originally financed in 2007 prior to the economic collapse. That economic downturn hit the arena hard, causing it to miss tax increment financing (TIF) projections.

As of August 2008, over $349 million in bonds were issued. It would cost upwards of $400 million to refinance the arena. Herrington said the major problem is seat sales are not generating enough money to cover debt payments, which start in 2019.

“Once you fall behind, it’s hard to catch up,” Herrington said.

Final payments for arena bonds are due September 2054.

“We are a part of this community, however, and it poses a challenge for us when we’re asked to step up and support a community asset perhaps somewhat beyond our comfort zone. That’s really where we are,” Postel said.

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Kyeland Jackson <![CDATA[U of L Foundation fires chief financial officer]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=49286 2017-07-19T16:05:27Z 2017-07-18T21:20:25Z By Kyeland Jackson — U of L fired its chief financial officer Tuesday, marking further fallout from the scathing June 8 audit. Foundation Chair Diane Medley would not say if Tomlinson was fired for cause and said the foundation will search for a replacement. Tomlinson’s termination follows more than a month of speculation, starting when […]

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By Kyeland Jackson —

U of L fired its chief financial officer Tuesday, marking further fallout from the scathing June 8 audit. Foundation Chair Diane Medley would not say if Tomlinson was fired for cause and said the foundation will search for a replacement.

Tomlinson’s termination follows more than a month of speculation, starting when he entered a “mutually agreed-upon leave.” News he was taking paid leave surfaced after June 8’s audit hammered U of L’s Foundation, alleging secrecy, deliberate overspending and questionable governance by former president James Ramsey and his administration. Tomlinson, Ramsey, and Ramsey’s former aide Kathleen Smith were top administrators in that regime. All were fired.

Medley said the removal of those former administrators gives the foundation a new start.

“It is what it is. Those top three individuals are no longer employees of the foundation,” Medley said after Tuesday’s meeting. “And as we’ve stated before, we are working to change the culture and change the processes that are going on here.”

Though hiring, firings and policy changes have reshaped the foundation and university, the donor impact has already hit hard. Keith Inman, U of L’s vice president for advancement, said donations are $21 million less now than fiscal year 2016.

Overall funds, he said, are down $97 million. He said both the NCAA scandal and publicity of the university and foundation’s governance affected donations. Through his 11-year tenure, he says this drop is unprecedented.

“We’ve never had anything like this affect us. This is the worst,” Inman said. “In our history here going through the campaign, up until now, we’ve broken records year after year. So we’re not used to reporting these kind of numbers.”

To lure donors back, Inman advised foundation directors clearly communicate the ULF’s mission and financially support it. Inman and the ULF Interim Executive Director Keith Sherman said donors have not totally rejected the university and will donate once U of L rights itself.

Tomlinson’s lawyer, Don Cox, was unavailable for comment at the time of this article.

File Photo / The Louisville Cardinal

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Shelby Brown <![CDATA[Board governance committee to revisit conflicts of interest]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=49280 2017-07-18T03:15:39Z 2017-07-18T03:15:39Z By Shelby Brown– The ad hoc committee on board governance set a deadline to review U of L’s conflict of interest policies. The committee will revisit the current policies and procedures, effective since 2011, July 24. Committee chair Bonita Black said the goal is to get a “fresh look” and develop a new process for […]

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By Shelby Brown–

The ad hoc committee on board governance set a deadline to review U of L’s conflict of interest policies. The committee will revisit the current policies and procedures, effective since 2011, July 24. Committee chair Bonita Black said the goal is to get a “fresh look” and develop a new process for vetting conflicts of interest.

“We really want to be watchdogs,” Black said.

Black said chairmen will be asked to give a confidentiality statement at the beginning of the next board of trustees meeting, July 2o.

“We appreciate very much if people recuse themselves from situations where they might have a potential or even an a appearance of a conflict,” she said.

In SACS’ most recent letter to U of L, their investigation expanded to include conflicts of interest. The university is up to nine possible violations. Currently, Interim President Greg Postel is collecting conflict of interest forms from trustees, university officers and interim officials.

“The progress that we’re trying to make here, I would love for us to be in a position to share that with SACS  in August as well,” Black said. “I think it shows our oversight, our commitment to transparency and openness and creating an environment of best practices around conflict of interest.”


Board of Trustees Nomination Slate

With no changes to the roster so far, the committee passed the Board of Trustee nomination slate for 2017-18.

During the meeting, Professor Enid Trucios-Haynes, accepted her nomination via video call. According to assistant secretary Jake Beamer, if the other five want to stay in their roles, Black will present the slate to the full board July 20.

The current officers are:

  • David Grissom, Chair
  • John Schnatter, Vice Chair
  • Diane Medley, Treasurer
  • Brian Cromer, Secretary
  • Nitin Sahney, At-Large Member elected to Executive Committee
  • Enid Trucios-Haynes, Faculty Constituency Representative on Executive Committee

Presidential Evaluation

The committee is planning an evaluation for both Postel and the eventual permanent president of U of L. The committee hopes to have Postel evaluated before Aug. 15, when documents are due to SACS.

The committee members have been assigned trustees to interview on Postel’s performance. The group have drawn reference from other universities, like UK, about the interview and evaluation process.

Trustees on the ad hoc are Black, James Rogers, Brian Cromer and Trucios-Haynes, faculty constituency representative. Each have been assigned two trustees, including Student Government Association President Vishnu Tirumala, who will serve as student constituency representative for 2017-18.

The deadline for interview completion is Aug. 2.

 

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Dalton Ray <![CDATA[Lamar Jackson named ACC preseason Player of the Year]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=49274 2017-07-17T16:13:41Z 2017-07-17T16:13:41Z By Dalton Ray– Preseason accolades are being handed out across the nation and football’s Lamar Jackson is tabbed as the ACC’s preseason Player of the Year by the media. As for the rest of the Cardinals, U of L is picked to finish third in the conference. The 2016 Heisman winner, Jackson received 113 votes […]

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By Dalton Ray–

Preseason accolades are being handed out across the nation and football’s Lamar Jackson is tabbed as the ACC’s preseason Player of the Year by the media. As for the rest of the Cardinals, U of L is picked to finish third in the conference.

The 2016 Heisman winner, Jackson received 113 votes to win the Player of the Year. FSU’s quarterback Deondre Francois finished second in the preseason Player of the Year voting with 23 votes.

Louisville earned seven first-place votes from the media, ranking them third in the entire ACC behind Florida State (118) and Clemson (35).

The Cardinals were also slotted to finish third in the Atlantic Division behind both the Seminoles and Tigers.

U of L kicks off their season against Purdue on Sept. 2 in Indianapolis, Indiana at Lucas Oil Stadium.

Photo by Laurel Slaughter / The Louisville Cardinal

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Dalton Ray <![CDATA[Football position breakdown: Offensive line]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=49187 2017-07-16T13:58:11Z 2017-07-16T13:58:11Z By Dalton Ray– Our position breakdown is in full swing after taking a look at the tight ends last week. The offensive line has been Louisville’s weakness since coach Bobby Petrino’s return. In his fourth year back, not much has changed. Looking to address the offensive line woes, Petrino hired former o-line coach Mike Summers back […]

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By Dalton Ray–

Our position breakdown is in full swing after taking a look at the tight ends last week.

The offensive line has been Louisville’s weakness since coach Bobby Petrino’s return. In his fourth year back, not much has changed. Looking to address the offensive line woes, Petrino hired former o-line coach Mike Summers back to the staff.

The Cards return two starters on a unit that allowed the nation’s second most sacks, 47, and 83 tackles for loss. Over the last two seasons, U of L has started 13 different starters, allowing 91 sacks and 180 tackles for loss.

Louisville addressed the offensive line in this year’s recruiting class, but the newcomers likely won’t make a large impact in year one. Both of the tackle spots are positives for U of L, but the interior is littered with inexperience and question marks.

Expected starters (left to right): Geron Christian, Cole Bentley, Robbie Bell, Kenny Thomas, Lukayus McNeil

Christian has started 26 straight games. The junior earned an All-ACC honorable mention as a freshman and third team honor last season. At 6-foot-6, 315 lbs., Christian’s draft stock is starting to rise as he one of the ACC’s top tackles.

Bentley is a true freshman and is the most surprising starter. From Belfry High School, Bentley’s athleticism and aggressiveness earned him a starting spot. Bentley will go through growing pains but his playing style will give him an edge.

Bell redshirted as a freshman and at 6-foot-5, 305 lbs., he has a great frame to anchor the line. Good hand-striking is one of Bell’s strengths but lowering his pad level will be an ongoing adjustment.

Thomas moved to guard this spring and has six career starts. His powerful hands and 6-foot-6, 333 lbs. frame make him a great fit for an interior lineman.

McNeil has 21 career starts and his ability to play multiple positions allows Louisville to be flexible. Arguably the most athletic lineman, McNeil has great toughness with excellent acceleration off the ball.

Key backups: Ronald Rudd, Danny Burns, Nathan Scheler

Rudd is a huge, figuratively and literally, land for U of L from the junior college ranks. The guards are a question for the Cardinals and Rudd is on the outside looking in. His pass blocking skills make him a strong candidate to step into the starting role if called upon.

With questions at the guard spot and the ability of McNeil to move around, Burns may have a chance to step into a starting role if McNeil slides inside. Burns has the size, 6-foot-6 and 325 lbs., but his technical skills have held him back in his first three years.

Scheler battled with Bell for the starting center spot this spring. If Bell struggles, Scheler will likely take over the snaps. Scheler, 6-foot-1 and 290 lbs.,  is a walk-on from Louisville’s St. X.

Photo by Laurel Slaughter / The Louisville Cardinal

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