The Louisville Cardinal U of L's Independent Student Newspaper 2017-11-25T02:47:34Z http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/feed/atom/ WordPress http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/media/2016/05/cropped-lc-logo-1-32x32.png Dalton Ray <![CDATA[Men’s basketball defeats St. Francis in drowsy atmosphere]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=53566 2017-11-25T02:47:34Z 2017-11-25T02:32:02Z By Dalton Ray — Led by junior Ray Spalding’s 19 points, 13 rebounds and four blocks, No. 19 men’s basketball defeated St. Francis 84-72. Spalding exited the second half with an ankle injury, but isn’t expected to miss any time. The Cardinals dominated the undersized Red Flashes, scoring 40 points in the paint compared to […]

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By Dalton Ray —

Led by junior Ray Spalding’s 19 points, 13 rebounds and four blocks, No. 19 men’s basketball defeated St. Francis 84-72. Spalding exited the second half with an ankle injury, but isn’t expected to miss any time.

The Cardinals dominated the undersized Red Flashes, scoring 40 points in the paint compared to St. Francis’ 20.

Despite the difference in size and talent, St. Francis kept the game close in the first half. After being down 22 in the second half, the Red Flashes cut the lead to eight before the Cardinals pulled away.

Acting head coach David Padgett said the team is 4-0 and that’s what is important. St. Francis’ quickness took some time to adjust to.

“They’re small, they’re quick off the dribble, they get in the lane … it’s tough to keep them in front of you and they do a good job of spacing,” Padgett said.

Padgett said his guards needed to do a better job of rebounding St. Francis’ long shots.

Sophomore VJ King started the game hot, making two of his first three shots. He soon cooled, finishing 3-of-11.

Louisville got up 16-9 with 12:32 in the first half, but missed their next eight shots. St. Francis couldn’t capitalize on the poor shooting, only scoring two points during the stretch.

A 3-pointer from Dwayne Sutton made the Louisville lead 21-13, but five straight made shots from St. Francis tied the game at 26.

Spalding sparked the run after the tie with a put back and block, leading to a 14-6 Louisville run.

U of L closed the half with a 46-35 lead.

In a quiet second half atmosphere, Louisville pushed their lead to 14 in the opening five minutes.

Back-to-back 3-pointers from senior Quentin Snider and a put back from Spalding made the lead 20.

The lead peaked at 22 with 12:32 to play, then St. Francis made their run.

The Red Flash made 6-of-7 shots, including four 3’s, to come within eight points with five to play.

Just as St. Francis heated up, they flamed out down the stretch, going for 2-for-9 to end the game.

Back-to-back 3’s from Adel and freshman Jordan Nwora iced the game for U of L.

Louisville weathered St. Francis’ two runs thanks to help of Adel.

“You want to control the pace of the game, but when they’re hitting 3’s every other possession, you feel that you have to be more urgent,” Adel said. “I think we did a good job of closing it out and staying patient.”

Louisville travels to Purdue for a ACC-Big Ten challenge on Nov. 28 at 8 p.m.

You can follow Dalton Ray on Twitter @dray5477.

Photos by Dalton Ray / The Louisville Cardinal

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Dalton Ray <![CDATA[Women’s basketball steam rolls Murray State]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=53552 2017-11-24T20:30:26Z 2017-11-24T20:30:26Z By Dalton Ray — Women’s basketball kicks their winning streak to six games with the annihilation of visiting Murray State. Ten Cardinals scored in the 115-51 dismantling of the Racers. The 115 points is a program — men’s and women’s — record. Leading scorers Asia Durr and Myisha Hines-Allen played limited minutes and didn’t crack […]

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By Dalton Ray —

Women’s basketball kicks their winning streak to six games with the annihilation of visiting Murray State. Ten Cardinals scored in the 115-51 dismantling of the Racers.

The 115 points is a program — men’s and women’s — record.

Leading scorers Asia Durr and Myisha Hines-Allen played limited minutes and didn’t crack double-digit scoring.

Bionca Dunham had a carrer day with 19 points and 16 rebounds. Kylee Shook added a career-high 21 points. Dunham finished with 22 minutes while Shook finished with 19.

“I didn’t expect that many minutes but I just got to the open spots and my teammates got me the ball,” Dunham said.

Shook said she had an idea the bench would got a lot of time.

“(Coach) mentioned he would split up minutes and he told us to go for it when we got the chance,” Shook said.

Coach Jeff Walz went to his bench early against the over-matched Racers, leading to a program record 76 points off the bench.

Walz hopes this type of performance from his bench will help them develop.

“What I have to get (the bench players) to understand is you might not get 20 minutes every night, but you have to come in when you get your opportunity and contribute,” Walz said.

Louisville led 29-8 after the first quarter, shooting 48 percent and forcing 10 turnovers. The rest of the game followed that narrative.

U of L finished shooting 55 percent and created 26 turnovers.

Louisville’s four leading scorers — Dunham, Shook, Sydeny Zambrotta and Dana Evans — all came from the bench.

Multiple Cardinals finished with career-highs, including walk-on Jessica Laemmle recording six assists.

Now 6-0, Louisville travels to Indiana on Nov. 30.

You can follow Dalton Ray on Twitter @dray5477. 

Photos by Dalton Ray / The Louisville Cardinal

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Megan Brewer <![CDATA[Campus mental health resources aren’t helping students]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=53255 2017-11-19T20:44:38Z 2017-11-23T14:01:34Z By Huda Jabbar —  Entering the University of Louisville, like any other college, we were bombarded with skits, lectures, flyers and emails that discussed the mental health resources available to us on campus. These resources were seen as a cushion to some, but to others they were a necessity in the transition from high school […]

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By Huda Jabbar — 

Entering the University of Louisville, like any other college, we were bombarded with skits, lectures, flyers and emails that discussed the mental health resources available to us on campus. These resources were seen as a cushion to some, but to others they were a necessity in the transition from high school to college.

But the harsh reality for these students  is that mental health services on our campus are sparse, at times dysfunctional and are unable to help students with more serious problems.

If you were to call the counseling center you would be told that you cannot make an appointment and could be put on a waitlist. Although the center does take walk-ins, most students don’t have  time to wait in an office for hours to get help.

If you do manage to make an appointment, which usually must be made two months in advance, and still feel comfortable enough to go to the counseling center, the center will try to “fix your problem” in 10 sessions or less. This makes the student feel rushed.

Another problem with the counseling center is that most counselors are not trained to deal with more serious mental issues but are there for more common everyday stresses.

If a student has a serious issue they need medication for, they can be referred to the psychiatric center on campus. Although this sounds like a great resource, students can be denied help if the center considers their issues are too serious.

This system leaves students with serious issues unable to get the inexpensive health services offered here, leaving them isolated with what seems like no solution.

It also leaves students with less serious issues feeling as though the counseling center is too busy dealing with “real problems” to deal with theirs.

U of L mental health resources need to be increased. Students should never be turned down on their journey to find help.

Students should be able to get immediate or almost immediate counseling where their problems feel important. If U of L does not increase its mental resources it could be detrimental to many students on campus.

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Kyeland Jackson <![CDATA[Conversations on the Edge: Gauging desire]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=53474 2017-11-21T17:30:50Z 2017-11-22T23:01:14Z This is a submission by a representative of University of Louisville Health Promotion, a division of Campus Health Services. This month’s topic, how to gauge desire with a partner or potential partner, offers a blueprint to know when someone you like is reciprocating romantic or sexual interest.  We will also discuss how to make sure […]

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This is a submission by a representative of University of Louisville Health Promotion, a division of Campus Health Services.

This month’s topic, how to gauge desire with a partner or potential partner, offers a blueprint to know when someone you like is reciprocating romantic or sexual interest.  We will also discuss how to make sure you’re responding to their desires appropriately when things begin to heat up.

Let’s first talk about how you can tell if someone likes you in a way that says, “Hey, I want to be more than friends.”  I heard from a few U of L students who shared their thoughts on the subject.

Caroline, a senior at U of L said, “body signals, language, and timing all come into play with knowing whether or not someone is into you. First, positive body signals such as laughter, tall posture, hugs, or kind actions are very helpful in determining this. Secondly, language and what someone has to say to you whether in person or over text can give someone an idea as to whether or not they are into them. If the person is always enthusiastic and responsive or asks you to do something … this shows that they are comfortable and … may be into you.”

She also added that the person you desire may also show their interest by how “quick (they are) to respond to messages or want to do things with you. They are willing to move things around to find time to do stuff with you.”

When you’ve established that you’re into someone, and they are into you, what comes next?  Talking about what you like and asking your partner what they like can be challenging, especially if you’re not accustomed to communicating about your desires verbally with another person.  If you’re like most people, you may have real fears about sharing your sexual desires with another person.   You may be nervous that your partner may reject you or think what you like is weird.  Or you may just feel uneasy about asking for what you want or like.  All of these feelings are natural and normal.

Hannah, a sophomore at U of L reported that “a lot of times it can be uncomfortable to have a real conversation about sex, even when you’re close with your partner. Even so, I find it’s really important to communicate clearly without beating around the bush so that everyone is on the same page, and everyone is getting what they want.”

It may be helpful in these situations to start the conversation off when you’re just hanging out with your partner, say over coffee, or a meal.  Sometimes watching a movie with some sexy scenes can spark a natural conversation, offering an opportunity to ask your partner what they like and how they like it.  Here are some sentence starters to help you make talking about desire easier:

  • Do you like it when I _____?
  • How would you like me to ______?
  • What do you want/like?
  • How do you feel about ________?
  • What do you think would be fun to try?
  • What would you like me to do/try?

Staying alert to the nonverbal cues a potential partner may be sending and practicing ways to communicate openly and clearly about your needs and your partner’s needs are the building blocks to consensual experiences that can be enjoyable for everyone involved.

Photo Courtesy / University of Louisville Health Promotion

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Dalton Ray <![CDATA[U of L officially cut ties to men’s basketball assistant coach Kenny Johnson]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=53532 2017-11-22T16:38:07Z 2017-11-22T16:28:10Z By Dalton Ray — Louisville has announced they have parted ways with men’s basketball associate head coach Kenny Johnson. Johnson, placed on administrative leave on Oct. 6, spent three years with the program. In a statement released by the university, they will have no further comment on the matter. The university is under FBI investigation […]

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By Dalton Ray —

Louisville has announced they have parted ways with men’s basketball associate head coach Kenny Johnson.

Johnson, placed on administrative leave on Oct. 6, spent three years with the program.

In a statement released by the university, they will have no further comment on the matter.

The university is under FBI investigation for a pay-to-play scandal involving freshman Brian Bowen and a 2019 recruit. The investigation shook the athletic department, leading to the firing of athletic director Tom Jurich.

Assistant coach Jordan Fair, the coach named in the indictment as making arrangements for Bowen, was fired on Oct. 11 for his role in the scandal. Former head coach Rick Pitino was officially fired five days later.

You can follow Dalton Ray on Twitter @dray5477. 

File photo / The Louisville Cardinal

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Dalton Ray <![CDATA[Brian Bowen will not play for Louisville]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=53525 2017-11-22T16:42:17Z 2017-11-22T16:11:08Z By Dalton Ray — Men’s basketball five-star freshman Brian Bowen has been informed by the university that he will not be able to practice with or compete for the men’s basketball program. Bowen will be allowed to transfer to another school or stay on scholarship if he decides to stay at U of L. Interim […]

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By Dalton Ray —

Men’s basketball five-star freshman Brian Bowen has been informed by the university that he will not be able to practice with or compete for the men’s basketball program.

Bowen will be allowed to transfer to another school or stay on scholarship if he decides to stay at U of L.

Interim athletic director Vince Tyra said Bowen has been very responsible ever since he enrolled in the summer.

“He has endeared himself to his teammates and the men’s basketball staff with a positive attitude during a very difficult period,” Tyra said.

U of L is currently under FBI investigation in a pay-for-play scandal. Bowen is named in the indictment as a player who was set to received payments organized by former assistant coach Jordan Fair.

Just after U of L announced Bowen will not play for the school, they announced they have terminated former associate head coach Kenny Johnson. 

You can follow Dalton Ray on Twitter @dray5477.

File photo / The Louisville Cardinal

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Wes Payne http://louisvillecardinal.com <![CDATA[Strong second half pushes men’s basketball past SIU]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=53516 2017-11-23T01:08:56Z 2017-11-22T04:08:32Z By Weston Payne — Nineteenth-ranked men’s basketball defeaed Southern Illinois 84-42 with 55 points coming in the second half. The Cardinals shot 31 percent in the first half, leading to a 28-19 halftime lead. Acting coach David Padgett had a simple answer to the poor shooting. “Take good shots and they’ll fall,” Padgett said. Louisville […]

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By Weston Payne —

Nineteenth-ranked men’s basketball defeaed Southern Illinois 84-42 with 55 points coming in the second half.

The Cardinals shot 31 percent in the first half, leading to a 28-19 halftime lead. Acting coach David Padgett had a simple answer to the poor shooting.

“Take good shots and they’ll fall,” Padgett said.

Louisville nearly cracked 60 percent shooting in the second half.

Key Players: Deng Adel & Jordan Nwora

Freshman Jordan Nwora accounted for 16 points, eight rebounds and +34 player efficiency rating. Junior Deng Adel scored 18 points with eight rebounds and four steals.

First half

In the first 10 minutes, both teams shot under 20 percent from the field. Soon after, the Cards used fast-break baskets to go on a 18-2 run.

Nwora sparked the run, shooting perfect 5-for-5 from inside-the-arc. Adel scored 12 of his 18 in the opening half.

Second half

The Cardinals picked up right where they left-off in the first half. SIU couldn’t catch a break on offense due to Louisville’s tight full-court press.

Freshman Darius Perry put g up 10 points and seven assists. Limited to two minutes in the first half, junior Ray Spalding posted eight points and five boards.

Padgett applauded the team’s willingness to learn.

“They’re great kids and competitive … they want to learn what it takes,” Padgett said.

The Cardinals have a Top-25 matchup Dec. 3 against No. 20 Seton Hall at 4 p.m.

You can follow Weston Payne on Twitter @weston_payne17

Photos by Karen Nguyen / The Louisville Cardinal 

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Megan Brewer <![CDATA[Faculty feels ignored in U of L presidential search]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=53054 2017-11-19T22:20:03Z 2017-11-21T14:01:25Z By Megan Brewer —  Applications for U of L’s next president are due Dec. 1. When the search was announced as closed in September the listening tours were agreed upon. Not only is the search closed, but the faculty haven’t had their voices heard as to what they want in a president. The Board of […]

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By Megan Brewer — 

Applications for U of L’s next president are due Dec. 1. When the search was announced as closed in September the listening tours were agreed upon.

Not only is the search closed, but the faculty haven’t had their voices heard as to what they want in a president.

The Board of Trustees, to no surprise, is not doing things by the book.

“Until the listening tour occurs, we can’t move much further with the search,” chair Bonita Black said at the Nov. 13 Presidential Search Faculty Search Subcommittee meeting.

Listening tours need to happen before the deadline for applications, but as of right now, that seems unlikely.

Pushing the deadline back could cause potential candidates to drop out according to search firm R. William Funk & Associates founder, but he says Dec. 1 is a “soft deadline.”

“The way that decisions have been made up to this point, the fact that this is our first meeting, some of the statements that have been made have been communicating something very different. (They are) communicating either that this search is rigged, it’s a sham or that the board doesn’t know what it’s doing,” U of L’s Arts & Sciences representative Susan Jarosi said.

Any of these options seem feasible. For the board to not set back the application deadline, a rigged search or a lack of knowledge of policies becomes believable.

Lack of knowledge or care for policies seems to be how the board’s operated multiple times, so for them to do it again isn’t much of a surprise.

For U of L to improve the board needs to take the faculty’s needs into consideration and find solutions to the issues with the presidential search.

The solution that would suit faculty the most would be to open the presidential search.

The next suitable solution for faculty would be to push back the date for applications until a listening tour can be scheduled.

The faculty needs to be heard before the pool for potential presidents closes since the next president will be who they directly work under.  This person will be their boss and who they look to for all matters at U of L.

Faculty should feel like this person is someone they can trust.

This can’t happen with a Dec. 1 deadline for applications, even if it is a “soft deadline” if there is no way for the faculty to be heard.

The board needs to start doing things the correct way, starting with pushing back the application deadline and having a listening tour. To continue putting the faculty first, the board should have open interviews with the presidential finalists.

Photo by Shelby Brown / The Louisville Cardinal

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Joseph Lyell <![CDATA[U of L dedicates tree to the life of Savannah Walker]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=53458 2017-11-21T00:36:25Z 2017-11-21T00:22:09Z By Joseph Lyell — More than two dozen people gathered near the observatory to remember Savannah Walker, a U of L student killed in a shooting at the Tim Faulkner Gallery this March. U of L’s Department of Communication dedicated a tree memorializing Walker’s accomplishments at the university. The tree is an silk ivory lilac, […]

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By Joseph Lyell —

More than two dozen people gathered near the observatory to remember Savannah Walker, a U of L student killed in a shooting at the Tim Faulkner Gallery this March.

U of L’s Department of Communication dedicated a tree memorializing Walker’s accomplishments at the university. The tree is an silk ivory lilac, one of only three on campus.

Pan-African Studies Department Chair Ricky Jones said losing Savannah is hard on the community, but said the tree will always remind us of what Walker is about.

“It brings us closer together, and I hope it reminds us what we’re all really here for,” Jones said.

Debate Team Director Tiffany Dillard-Knox said Savannah kept the team laughing, and was always improving.

“She was dedicated, she was a fighter,” Dillard-Knox said. “She loved debate.”

Dean Walker, Savannah’s father, said she honed her debate skills at home. At the dedication, Walker thanked the community. He said he took Savannah to look at 100 universities across the country before she decided on U of L. She wanted to stay close to friends and family, which was what he hoped for.

“I want to thank the U of L community. Faculty, staff here, and her fellow students have really been a great support to me. I love this place,” Walker said. “She could have gone anywhere she wanted and she picked Louisville, and she was so proud to be a part of this campus and this community.”

Walker thanked those attending for their continued support.

“It’s sad that she’s gone, but she left — in a short amount of time — a really great legacy of just true enjoyment and a lot of friends here on campus. This was a great experience for her.”

The tree is on campus, centered in the lawn adjacent to the planetarium. A placard in front of the tree describes Savannah as a devoted daughter and Cardinal.

Photo by Joseph Lyell / The Louisville Cardinal

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Kyeland Jackson <![CDATA[Chilled debate on presidential search ignites in board meeting]]> http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/?p=53455 2017-11-21T17:22:23Z 2017-11-20T23:57:52Z By Kyeland Jackson — Professor Susan Jarosi asked for open discussion on the presidential search Monday and the U of L Board of Trustees answered with silence. After a pause, board Chair David Grissom asked if there would be further discussion and prepared to move to the next issue. But faculty trustee Enid Trucios-Haynes pressed […]

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By Kyeland Jackson —

Professor Susan Jarosi asked for open discussion on the presidential search Monday and the U of L Board of Trustees answered with silence. After a pause, board Chair David Grissom asked if there would be further discussion and prepared to move to the next issue. But faculty trustee Enid Trucios-Haynes pressed for conversation on the search, opening a tense debate on how the university would find its next president.

Jarosi, also president for U of L’s American Association of University Professors, said the board has made missteps and delays in the search. Presidential search hearing tours, promised for constituents to voice opinions about the presidential search, lay among those delays. Jarosi questioned the tours, pointing to 18 letters constituents sent to the board which, she says, received no answer.

“This is your opportunity to speak to us, meaning everyone here, about your thoughts on this process because we’ve heard so little from you,” Jarosi said. “A lot of faculty are asking what a listening tour means if we send 18 letters to you and we don’t receive a response or an acknowledgement or response. Are you really listening?”

Acting Provost Dale Billingsley wrote one of those letters. Billingsley said an open search is vital to building a relationship with the university.

“It is critical to the academic enterprise, to the pursuit of freedom, academic freedom and intellectual freedom, for that business to go forward in the way that we have understood it,” Billingsley said. “It is critical for the academic community of the university to understand the commitment of this board and the future president of the university to act on behalf of the students and the faculty in the pursuit of the academic mission of the university.”

When the discussion ended, five trustees had offered criticism or recommendations for the presidential search process. Among them was SGA President Vishnu Tirumala, who suggested search finalists meet with councils on campus. In closing, Jarosi warned keeping the search closed would be divisive.

But the board’s chair doubled down.

Grissom said Tirumala’s suggestion wouldn’t work, and reiterated the importance of a closed search. The board might discuss a compromise for the search with its presidential search firm.

“While we have received substantial communications from the faculty in opposition to this process, we continue to believe this process will produce the best possible candidates,” Grissom said, reading from a hand-written statement. “The closed search process is best practice and is most likely to produce the best possible man or woman to be our next president.”

Raymond Burse, Kentucky State University’s former president, defended Grissom and the closed search. Grissom, Burse said, works hard for the university and is trying to better it.

“I know individuals who would be interested in this position who are sitting presidents. I can tell you, they’re not going to apply if their names going to be plastered across the media,” Burse said. “What I have seen and observed is a chairman who is hardworking, honest, always above board, making certain that every view and every point of view is heard out and taken care of … I appreciate the leadership that you’re providing and giving to this board.

The deadline for the president’s position was extended to January, but the soft deadline is Dec. 1. Listening tours are also expected to happen in January.

Grissom declined to say how many candidates are vying for the spot, but Interim President Greg Postel said he has submitted his name for the position. U of L Professor Ricky Jones also announced he may apply for the position in an interview with the Cardinal Monday.

File Photo / The Louisville Cardinal

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