The Louisville Cardinal

“Black Panther” is more than a movie, it’s a movement

By Starr Savoy —

Marvel’s “Black Panther” is a must-see movie for everyone with excellent graphics, characters, action and message of black empowerment.

Released Feb. 16, “Black Panther” was one of the most anticipated movies of 2018. Celebrities like Octavia Spencer and T.I. bought out screenings for people in communities who might otherwise not be able to see the film, according to the Washington Post. At the premiere, stars turned out in droves wearing African, Spanish and South African inspired ensembles. Moviegoers around the world followed suit, posting their fashion on social media.

“Black Panther” starts off with a bang and keeps you on the edge of your seat. After T’Challa/Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman) takes his rightful place as king of Wakanda, many challenges are faced. When confronted with an enemy, T’Challa must reconcile his two identities to save his country, prove his right as king and save the world.

Director Ryan Coogler, known for films like “Fruitvale Station” and “Creed,” did a great job creating a diverse film. The characters in “Black Panther” represent strength in adversity.

Coogler, a true rags to riches story, produced “Fruitvale Station” while he was living out of his car. Michael B. Jordan, one of the “Black Panther” stars, also worked with Coogler in “Creed” and “Fruitvale Station.”

According to Time, “Black Panther” might be the first big-budget movie to have an African-American director and a predominantly black cast. “Black Panther” has provided the black community a portrayal of greatness and representation in a film. In the movie, African-Americans are represented as kings and queens, not thugs and criminals.

Marvel creating a movie without the typical white cast puts pressure on Hollywood to create more diverse films.

This movie provides figures for young African-American kids to look up to. “Black Panther” is a must-see movie for everyone.