Consumer Reports rates condom performance

 Consumer Reports rates condom performanceBy Dylan Lightfoot

 Consumer Reports published its ratings of condoms this month, putting 23 different types of latex condoms to the test. The consumer watchdogs used compressed air – rather than conventional means – to measure condom strength and found “no correlation between performance and price, thickness or the country of manufacture.”

While all models tested met minimum industry standards, some did perform better than others. Durex Extra Sensitive Lubricated took first place, followed by Durex Performax Lubricated and Lifestyles Classic Collection Ultra Sensitive Lubricated. The classic Trojan-Enz faired poorly at 18th.

The average condom broke only after taking 38 liters of air.

 Lifestyles Tuxedo Black, the condom currently distributed at Belknap’s Student Health Services, was not among the models tested.

However, two of the models distributed by the Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) under their own brand name, “Assorted Colors” and “Honeydew,” were ranked dead last, their strength being significantly lower compared to the other brands. PPFA President Gloria Feldt responded with a statement pointing out that, despite Consumer Reports’ test results, her group’s condoms still met minimum industry standards.

Feldt said in her statement that Planned Parenthood “will continue to conduct rigorous testing and monitoring to ensure that all of our condoms remain top-quality products.” The statement also announced that PPFA has improved its Honeydew condoms to ensure better performance.

But C.R.’s testing did not address the issue of condom effectiveness at the microscopic level: permeability. A 1998 study  at the Naval Research Laboratory tested the permeability of two different latex condoms of 50 and 90 microns (millionths of a meter) thickness. They observed that, regardless of condom thickness, particles 0.1 microns in diameter penetrated at the rate of over one million per square centimeter over 30 minutes.

But latex is a material of intrinsic irregularity, according to researchers. In the Naval Research Laboratory study, particles a full micron in size also passed though, at the rate of 1000 per half-hour over the same area. The AIDS virus is 0.15 microns across. Hepatitis B is tinier still. Using electron microscopy, Naval Research Laboratory scientists also found “maximum inherent flaws” up to 700 times the diameter of the AIDS virus, and easily wide enough for sperm to wriggle though a dozen abreast.

Other studies on condom effectiveness in prevention of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) have shown varied results. The Centers for Disease Control Web site discusses these in detail at http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pubs/facts/condoms.htm, but conclude that more research must be done.

Still, condoms are a statistically effective means of contraception when used consistently, with only five percent of women relying exclusively on condoms having unintended pregnancies per year. And while their precise value in preventing STI transmission is still in contention pending further research, according to many health experts, they remain the safest bet for protection against STIs.

Rape semantics give false sense of security

 Rape semantics give false sense of security By Abi Smith

We should always be careful with language; it can be a powerfully reckless thing.

Following the campus’ December sexual assault, the Department of Public Safety and others have referred to the incident as a “stranger rape,” the likes of which has not occurred at the University of Louisville since 1968. For purposes of classification, distinguishing between two types of sexual assualt is necessary. The problem, though, is that the separation creates a distinction without a meaningful difference and distorts our understanding of rape, rapists and rape victims in the process.

The “stranger rape” label is myopic and can give people a false sense of security. Women start looking around for scruffy jerks who seem out of place. Campus police begin closely monitoring parking garages and dimly lit areas that might attract an outside predator.

But what gets neglected is the fact that campus-grown date rapists are lurking. And there exists no difference between the man who lies in wait for a random victim and the man who opportunistically violates the trust of a girl he knows. Both are rapists. So while enumerable misogynistic enemies certainly exist without, more than a few are to be found  within.

Furthermore, lending too much credence to the “stranger rape” distinction only deepens vacuous, peanut gallery assessments of rape victims. “Date rape” incidents always seem to culminate in the accuser’s integrity and reputation being questioned. The victim of a “stranger rape,” on the other hand – where suspicious circumstances are absent – instantly receives sympathy. “If she didn’t know him, then he must be guilty,” we think. This atrocious methodology of assessing the believability of another human being is fueled by the aforementioned differentiation between rapes. And heaven help the “date rape” victim who’s telling the truth.

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, it can be argued that the rape distinction – as it relates to the last month’s incident – has spawned unintentional insensitivity to any victims at U of L who were acquainted with their attackers. As recently reported in The Cardinal, DPS director Wayne Hall has stated, “Usually the victims know who commits the rape. I’ve been here 14 years and there hasn’t been anything like this since I’ve been here.”

My initial reaction concurred with Hall’s; considering the three-decade time span between the “stranger rapes,” one cannot help but focus on the shocking singularity. But how awful must it be for the campus’ acquaintance-assault victims to have their experiences made sub-par simply because the person who committed this latest violation was foreign to his prey? Why are these victims made to feel as though their experiences were usual and customary while December’s case was somehow special? The pain of every rape victim is the same. And since there is no emotional difference between types of rape, there is also no difference between the targets.

Between all of these women, there exists an unfortunate kinship. And this should be remembered by those of us on the outside of their bond.

 

Abi Smith is a graduate student in Political Science and a columnist for The Cardinal.

E-mail her at: asmith@louisvillecardinal.com

Researchers look to nanotechnology to improve military missile defense

 Researchers look to nanotechnology to improve military missile defense By University Of Louisville Press Release

Speed professor Robert Cohn and a study team explore many ways to make near-atomic-sized nanotechnology devices. Cohn’s team recently found a novel way to make bridge-like structures of 50-nanometer polymer wires suspended on pillars (below).

Recent news about the possible development by other nations of nuclear and chemically armed ballistic missiles has put American missile defense back in the spotlight. To keep America’s missile defenses up to date, the U.S. Army is looking for help from nanotechnology researchers at the University of Louisville.

Nanotechnology refers to near-atomic-scale wires, tubes and other materials that have a wide range of potential applications in the military, medicine and in other fields.

Electrical and computer engineering professor Robert Cohn is leading a team of six faculty members, several research scientists and students from Speed School and the physics department in the College of Arts and Sciences on a major research effort.

So far, the “Nanowire Technology for Missile Defense” study has received federal funding totaling $3 million that supports research through September 2005, and Cohn expects additional installments as the team continues to develop pilot, or proof-of-principle, devices and materials.

“Missile systems are very complex, and the Army is looking for any technology that improves their missiles and systems to defend against the missiles of others,” Cohn said. “The question is: Can nanotechnology give us an edge?”

Nanowires could be used as electronics, sensors and mechanical actuators needed by warhead guidance systems to find their targets, Cohn said. The research also could meet other military needs in sensing chemical threats or tracking hostile planes or missiles.

“In rockets or anything else that flies, you obviously want lighter-weight materials to improve fuel economy. Nanowire materials can provide this light weight together with a number of functions that can improve accuracy of guidance system,” Cohn explained.

“We’re working on some nanoscale-sized sensors, for example,” he added. “Sensors can detect all kinds of things—chemicals, light, colors, sound and more. A missile might need to recognize an object based on color, so we could possibly develop tiny sensors that can detect those colors or detect lasers set to certain wavelengths and so on.”

To boost the effort, Cohn’s group is acquiring the best nanotechnology lab equipment available. The group recently received a grant from the National Science Foundation to buy a cutting-edge, virtual-presence surface-profiling microscope for nanomanipulation and nanoassembly.

The federal grant has provided for a high-resolution scanning electron microscrope and an advanced (Raman) spectroscopy instrument. Faculty team member Mahendra Sunkara also secured funds for an extreme resolution transmission electron microscope. The instruments together cost around $3 million.

Sen. Mitch McConnell has been instrumental in securing the funds both for the Army study and for the extreme resolution microscope.

“With equipment such as this, it’s becoming very easy to manipulate objects and structures and to form or grow materials that are smaller than 100 nanometers, or one one-thousandth the diameter of a human hair and below,” Cohn said. “We’re getting down to the size of atoms, which is on the order of two-tenths of a nanometer. And in that scale range it’s becoming realistic to build materials from the bottom up and to make wonderful new devices.”

Cohn said there are many ways to make nanowires from raw materials by using lasers, electricity, force and heat to drive chemical reactions.

In one novel approach, Cohn has found a way to make structures that resemble tiny suspension bridges.

“We just reported a study in the journal Nano Letters in which we hand-brushed a liquid polymer over a surface of tiny pillars. The polymer dries, forming arrays of 50-nanometer wires suspended on the pillars.”

Cohn said his team is investigating possible applications for such structures.

It remains to be determined whether nanotechnology gives the U.S. an edge in missile systems, but one thing is certain: Nanotechnology has revolutionized the way Cohn and his colleagues do their work.

“Not long ago,” he said, “I wouldn’t have thought it would be possible for someone to make a device by finding a wire you didn’t even know was there—pushing it into position, making a measurement on it and doing it all in a little chamber while watching under a large microscope —and, in a few minutes, do research that used to take a year to do.

“Now with the new tools available to us we have done entire research studies in an afternoon.”

By Kevin Rayburn. Reprinted from the winter 2005 issue of Speed Engineer, the J.B. Speed School of Engineering alumni newsletter.

 

An Albatross set to spark a Lazer revolution

 An Albatross set to spark a Lazer revolutionBy Eric Butler

Let’s not be coy. “We Are the Lazer Viking,” an 11-track E.P. from the Philly-based band An Albatross, is loud, abrasive and chaotic. In fact, it’s downright noisy.

The band can’t keep a single melody going for more than fifteen seconds – hell, the longest song on the album doesn’t even last a minute and a half. Right away you realize this is something very different than your average band.

As for the music, An Albatross employs a heavy electro-synth sound that skitters all over the musical spectrum and dares your brain and body (assuming you’re trying to dance) to keep up. Regular guitars, bass and drums are also incorporated into the sonic onslaught, throwing furious tantrums of unmitigated energy. The end result is what I imagine to be the theme music rattling inside the brains of ADHD kids who’ve spent their medication money on Pop Rocks.

And then there are the vocals. This isn’t just yelling; this is shrieking. This is your own throat hurting as you listen to Ed Gleda’s vocal chords straining against the air being pushed out of his lungs. In their song “The Vitally Important Pelvic Thrust,” Gleda sums it up nicely: “We’ll scream so loud / We can’t even f—ing breathe.”

This is kind of unfortunate, because a lot of the song lyrics are entertaining. Take, for example, the album’s second track, “Let’s Get On With It!”:

“Let’s get on with it, Let’s get it on! / I said, the spectacle / You’re a witness of / Is a call / For free love! / Reclaim the sheets! / Out of the bedrooms and into the streets!”

What’s particularly interesting is the effect the music has on its audience. While you’re listening, all semblance of reality and civility goes right out the window, and for the album’s duration – all eight minutes and 20 seconds of it – you lose your mind completely.

It’s quite a feeling, actually.

The E.P.’s standout track is number four, “The Revolutionary Politics of Dance,” in part because it feels like it’s actually trying to be a song. There is a lot more structure and musical coherence here that really hooks you in and gets your toes tapping.

At other places on the album the instruments are kind of aloof and doing their own thing, like a preschool classroom with a few kids chasing each other around, others painting each other’s faces, and maybe one kid peeing in the corner.

And for some people, listening to An Albatross will be just as annoying as trying to coordinate those preschoolers.

This is the type of album – well, the type of music in general – that a casual or unsuspecting listener might literally run to the stereo to turn off immediately. Their sound is instantly jarring, and intentionally so.

An Albatross makes its listeners uncomfortable, but then, that’s kind of the point. There are practical effects to creating music that’s unsettling, and perhaps An Albatross is doing it to shake their listeners from their slumber and make them shake their butts. They wrote a song about it, after all, the aforementioned “The Revolutionary Politics of Dance.” Here’s a sample:

“Y’got the sweatpants and sexy striped kneesocks, / Our horned helmets, struttin’ the bad boogaloo. / Yes, it’s Lazer Empowerment, children!”

Okay, maybe that’s a bad example.

But seriously, An Albatross is trying to shake things up. The song “The Triumph of the Lazer Viking” offers a typical sarcastic wake-up call, saying, “Eat your vitamins on time. / Tussinned, healthy, and in line. / Pills and stomach chime, / Motherf—in’ feelin’ fine.” Other songs like “The Manifesto of the Divine Children” and “Electric Suits and Cowboy Boots” emphasize freedom and letting go of your inhibitions.

The most revolutionary vigor, though, seems to come during their live shows. “We Are the Lazer Viking” is also a CD-ROM and includes videos of some of their past performances. Every show appears much the same, with members of the band and audience jumping, flailing, shrieking, falling over and getting back up. If this isn’t an exhibition of pure personal freedom and release, I don’t know what is.

In short, bands like An Albatross are trying to bring about some kind of revolution, but instead of worrying about raising your consciousness, An Albatross cuts to the chase and just punches you square in the chest.

For anyone needing a good wallop, the band will be coming to Louisville this Thursday, Jan. 27, to play an all-ages show at the Keswick Democratic Club, 1127 Logan St. Also on the bill are The Power and the Glory and The Cinema Eye, plus local heavyweights Coliseum, Lords and Ayin. It all starts at 5 p.m. and admission is $6.

Their set will likely be an all-out freak-out session, so come prepared. An Albatross, as they’ve said, is a Lazer Viking, and they’re here to rock your block off.

Even if it’s just for eight minutes.

Writers share publishing tips

 Writers share publishing tipsBy Charlie Denison

 

There are young writers throughout the country with stories or poems sitting on a shelf somewhere. What can they do with them? What does it take to get to the next step? And how and where can they be published?

Jason Lee Jordan finds it useful to keep a writer’s journal, read a lot, and have others read and critique his material. Jordan is a regular book reviewer for the Web-based Decomposition Magazine and has also been published in The Giles Corey Press, The Edward Society, Bloviate This and other online publications. Jordan recently published the first issue of his own zine called Melancholiks. The zine features dark material in a satirical light.

Several distinguished writers suggested learning how to write in more than one style or genre. For instance, Ernest Hemingway was a journalist for several years before his famous works of fiction were published. And Daniel Castro, a young writer from New Orleans currently studying English at Indiana University, is a fiction writer but covered stories for the Indiana Daily Student.

Small steps can be made to get your name out as a writer. However, Castro said, “Getting published in magazines can often be more about who you know than what you write. It’s hard to get published for the first time. Editors have a lot to read, and if they don’t see that your work has been in anywhere else it makes it much easier to toss into the wastebasket.”

Some of Castro’s fictional short stories have been published in a New Orleans short fiction magazine. “Names mean a lot,” he said. “Either names of people you know, or names of other publications you’ve appeared in.”

Local writer Mike Smith, author of the novel “Tell Christian I’m Sorry,” agreed with Castro.

“Getting published does indeed have a great deal to do with who you know, but I don’t think it’s universal – it differs on a case by case basis,” said Smith. “For instance, I didn’t know too many people involved in publishing when ‘Tell Christian’came out in 2003, and my relationship with Wasteland Press was started by me alone.”

Smith is also the publisher and editor of the online-only Decomposition Magazine. The magazine was created in April of 2004 and has featured several poems and prose pieces as well as short stories, including Carrie Turner’s humorously disturbing “Miss Priscilla’s Dead,” which recounts the author’s experience at a backwoods Kentucky funeral. Writers from West Virginia, Colorado, Chicago and New York have been published as Decomposition continues to grow.

Drew Austin, whose work won a 2002 Quill and Scroll award and was published in Umbra and The Levee Review, offered advice on the writing itself.

“If you’re trying to get published, you should think of the audience who will read it during the writing process,” said Austin, who won the award for a story about a peer who died from huffing aerosol. “I wouldn’t try to write just to please other people, but it’s very important to question whether anyone else will actually want to read it.”

Guides such as “The Shortest Distance between You and a Published Book” by Susan Page, “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Getting Published” by Sheree Bykofsky, and “How to Get Happily Published: A Complete and Candid Guide” by Judith Appelbaum might also prove useful. Also, a creative writing class or a writers’ workshop provides a good sounding board and support group for some writers.

Connections certainly play a part, but there are several opportunities here in Louisville to submit work. Writers can send submissions to The Giles Corey Press at giles-coreypress@yahoo.com by March 4 for publication in their next magazine, due out April 12.

Decomposition Magazine at http://www.decompositionmagazine.com accepts submissions at any time, as does Simon McKim’s “Bloviate This” (bloviate_zine@hotmail.com).

If you’re one of those writers with work stashed away, there are many opportunities for you in Louisville. Expose yourself and your writing. Like Robin Williams said in “Dead Poet’s Society,” “Carpe diem.”

Women’s basketball wins nailbiter against Houston 50-49

 Women's basketball wins nailbiter against Houston 50-49By Glypie Grider And Catherine Laroche

Tied at 49 with three seconds remaining, senior Angel Bradley hit the second of her two free throws to give the Cards a one-point victory over Houston Sunday night. In front of an ESPN-televised audience in Freedom Hall, the Cardinals defeated the Cougars, the only undefeated team in Conference USA play.

The first half saw 10 lead-changes and three ties. Louisville kept the lead at the start of the second half, but the Cougars kept clawing back. With less than 15 minutes in the game, sophomore Jazz Covington hit back-to-back jumpers for the 40-30 Cardinal lead. Houston then went on a 6-0 run.

With just under four minutes of play, Houston freshman Kadi Creel hit a three-pointer and Crystal Simpson hit two free throws to cut the lead to three.

At the 1:27 mark, Sancho Lyttle coverted two free throws to tie the game at 47. Louisville’s Katie Olson hit a jumper on the left side with 56 seconds remaining to give the Cards a 49-47 advantage.

Kiemona Harris hit a jumper with 33 seconds remaining to tie the game. Jessica Huggins’ three-point attempt bounced off the rim, and Bradley drew the rebound and a foul.

Bradley led all scorers with 16 points. Covington had 12 points while Missy Taylor led the Cards with 10 rebounds. Lyttle led Houston with 15 points.

Louisville vs. TCU

The U of L women’s basketball team had to overcome a double-digit deficit to pull out a six-point victory over TCU on Friday.

But the victory didn’t come easily.

Shortly after tip-off, the Horned Frogs took off with an 8-1 lead. With a lay-up from Taylor, the Cardinals managed to cut the lead to 8-5. But that wasn’t enough to stop TCU. With only seven minutes left in the first half, they went up 16-5 after an 8-0 run. Junior guard Jessica Huggins helped cut TCU’s lead to nine with two free throws, but the Horned Frogs had the 31-16 lead at half time.

The Cards opened the second half in the full-court press, which helped spark an 11-0 run. With 16:55 left in the game, sophomore Jazz Covington cut TCU’s lead to 31-27 with a lay-up. But at 14 minutes, TCU’s Nikki Newton and Sandora Irvin opened the lead back up to 38-27.

The Cardinals were not about to give up the game. They continued to press, while Taylor connected on a lay-up in transition to put the lead in single-digits again. With only 12 minutes left in the game, TCU had a 42-31 lead. But then, a three-pointer by Covington sparked a 15-0 run which gave the Cards a four-point lead with just seven minutes left.

After two free throws by TCU, U of L went on a 7-0 run from a three-pointer from Covington to bring the lead up to 53-44. TCU sliced the lead to four twice in the final minute, but the Cards connected on six of eight free throws to win 63-57.

Covington led all scorers with 22 points and 13 rebounds. Taylor tallied 14 points, eight rebounds and a career-high five blocks.

“We didn’t have our best effort in the first half,” Taylor said. “Coach Collen wasn’t too impressed with the first half. But he said that he was proud of how we stepped up, came back and never gave up.”

Louisville Project changes face of collegiate debate

 Louisville Project changes face of collegiate debateBy Phillip M. Bailey

“Perhaps that is the greatest problem that black students face … they are never asked to create, only to imitate.” –Stokely Carmichael, Morgan University (1967)

The University of Louisville debate team is no mere academic club. It is a movement. Conceived by Dr. Ede Warner, the “Louisville Project” receives the same reaction most movements do when challenging pillars of Western thought: ultimate resistance.

Originally perceived as a nonsensical effort to once again cry foul at “the Man,” the squad’s national victories and real-world engagements have pressured other teams to seriously reexamine their model of debate. Since then the cries of illegitimacy have slightly eroded. I emphasize slightly, like any movement to expand inclusion backlashes are mandatory, fierce, and in some instances bizarre. 

Unfortunately,s most media coverage of the team has centered on the typical abbreviated race melodrama of mostly inner-city black students confronting 95 percent white, usually Ivy League teams. Rarely discussed are the ideas that Louisville exports and how the University of Louisville, although anchored by conservatism institutionally, houses one of the most radical intellectual movements functioning today.

Unfortunately, descriptions of black radical intellectuals and their production are lacking. Michael Walzer in “The Company of Critics” says radical black intellectuals can be identified by their consistent “political censure, moral indictment, skeptical question, satiric comment, angry prophecy, [and] utopian speculation.” Walzer’s description grasps the Louisville model. However, further study reveals the debate team belongs to a larger movement in league with thinkers who scholar Anthony Bogues describes as heretics, like W.E.B. Du Bois, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Walter Rodney and Anna Julia Cooper, just to name a few.

“First,” Bogues states, “is the sense of challenging orthodoxy.” Many of the Louisville debaters originally accepted the traditional model but eventually discarded it altogether. “Traditional debate excludes blacks,” said Stephanie Mitchell, who was a traditional debater at her Chicago high school. Herded into Urban Debate Leagues, African-American debaters rarely compete with their white counterparts and have distinctively separate and unequal experiences.

After challenging the orthodoxy, intellectual heretics, according to Bogues, develop a “constructive project … a different set of political and social categories.” For the Louisville team, its construction and application is an alternative model known as the three-tier process:

1. Traditional evidence: from accredited authors and information based in academia.

2. Organic intellectuals: members of aggrieved communities who challenge the dominant structure with counter-hegemonic discourse.

3. Social location: your personal experience in relation to the topic.

Using the three-tier process the squad has confronted the Birmingham, Ala. of academia with a booming analysis that the model of debate, not black intelligence, are barriers to an inclusive debate community by forging its own version of debate thus rejecting a replica in blackface. Stokely would be proud.

 

Phillip M. Bailey is a junior double-majoring in Political Science and Sociology, Chair of the U of L

SNCC and is a columnist for The Cardinal.

E-mail him at: pbailey@louisvillecardinal.com

 

Louisville Project changes face of collegiate debate

 Louisville Project changes face of collegiate debateBy Phillip M. Bailey

“Perhaps that is the greatest problem that black students face … they are never asked to create, only to imitate.” –Stokely Carmichael, Morgan University (1967)

The University of Louisville debate team is no mere academic club. It is a movement. Conceived by Dr. Ede Warner, the “Louisville Project” receives the same reaction most movements do when challenging pillars of Western thought: ultimate resistance.

Originally perceived as a nonsensical effort to once again cry foul at “the Man,” the squad’s national victories and real-world engagements have pressured other teams to seriously reexamine their model of debate. Since then the cries of illegitimacy have slightly eroded. I emphasize slightly, like any movement to expand inclusion backlashes are mandatory, fierce, and in some instances bizarre. 

Unfortunately,s most media coverage of the team has centered on the typical abbreviated race melodrama of mostly inner-city black students confronting 95 percent white, usually Ivy League teams. Rarely discussed are the ideas that Louisville exports and how the University of Louisville, although anchored by conservatism institutionally, houses one of the most radical intellectual movements functioning today.

Unfortunately, descriptions of black radical intellectuals and their production are lacking. Michael Walzer in “The Company of Critics” says radical black intellectuals can be identified by their consistent “political censure, moral indictment, skeptical question, satiric comment, angry prophecy, [and] utopian speculation.” Walzer’s description grasps the Louisville model. However, further study reveals the debate team belongs to a larger movement in league with thinkers who scholar Anthony Bogues describes as heretics, like W.E.B. Du Bois, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Walter Rodney and Anna Julia Cooper, just to name a few.

“First,” Bogues states, “is the sense of challenging orthodoxy.” Many of the Louisville debaters originally accepted the traditional model but eventually discarded it altogether. “Traditional debate excludes blacks,” said Stephanie Mitchell, who was a traditional debater at her Chicago high school. Herded into Urban Debate Leagues, African-American debaters rarely compete with their white counterparts and have distinctively separate and unequal experiences.

After challenging the orthodoxy, intellectual heretics, according to Bogues, develop a “constructive project … a different set of political and social categories.” For the Louisville team, its construction and application is an alternative model known as the three-tier process:

1. Traditional evidence: from accredited authors and information based in academia.

2. Organic intellectuals: members of aggrieved communities who challenge the dominant structure with counter-hegemonic discourse.

3. Social location: your personal experience in relation to the topic.

Using the three-tier process the squad has confronted the Birmingham, Ala. of academia with a booming analysis that the model of debate, not black intelligence, are barriers to an inclusive debate community by forging its own version of debate thus rejecting a replica in blackface. Stokely would be proud.

 

Phillip M. Bailey is a junior double-majoring in Political Science and Sociology, Chair of the U of L

SNCC and is a columnist for The Cardinal.

E-mail him at: pbailey@louisvillecardinal.com

 

DPS warns of suspicious character near Fourth St.

By Allison M. Strickland

Only days into the new semester, the Department of Public Safety issued a warning about an individual harassing students in and around the Fourth Street parking lots.

DPS issued a crime report on Jan. 12 reporting that a subject had been approaching U of L students and asking for a ride to his nonexistent vehicle. When the students and subject would arrive at the designated location, the subject would say that his car had been towed and proceed to pressure them for money.

The suspect is an African-American male in his 20s or 30s, and is possibly a homeless person who may frequent the north end of the Belknap Campus and the area around the Fourth Street parking lots.

Wayne Hall, the director of Public Safety, said there have been several reports of this person attempting to get rides from students, and that some students have let him into their vehicles. The last report was approximately a week and a half ago.

The Fourth Street lots are in an area surrounded by property that does not belong to the university. “We have two or three cameras over there on that lot, but what makes it hard is for us to determine who should be there and who shouldn’t be there,” said Hall.

The security officer who monitors the Fourth Street lots works from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m., and officers patroll the campus 24 hours a day. Most of the incidents have occurred in the evening.

Marcus Crumbacher, a senior CIS major, said that approximately one year ago a man approached him and asked him for a ride to his car. Crumbacher said of the subject, “He looked like he could have been a student …  coming from Bettie Johnson.”

Crumbacher drove the subject to a Shell station near campus. When they arrived, the man said he couldn’t find his vehicle, claiming his car had been towed. Crumbacher then drove him to an impound and the man went inside while Crumbacher waited outside in the car.

The man then came back out and claimed he didn’t have enough money to pay the tow fee. Crumbacher gave him $50 and the man told him he could be repaid by one of the subject’s friends at Gray’s Bookstore.

Crumbacher went to Gray’s and asked around, but no one knew what he was talking about.

“One of my residents actually approached me about this last semester, so I was concerned to see it was not an isolated incident,” said Michael D. Anthony, resident director of Louisville Hall. “The day before the crime alert was released, the apartment manager from UTA and I were discussing how one of her residents was victim to this very situation.”

“We want students to be aware of this man before these incidents turn into a crime,” said Major Kenny Brown, DPS assistant director.

U of L student deemed royalty

By Charles L. Westmoreland

One U of L student will be getting ready for the Kentucky Derby early this year. But the road leading up to Kentucky’s trademark annual event will literally be a ‘royal engagement’ for senior Stephanie Bumpus who was selected as one of this year’s Kentucky Derby Festival Princesses.

Bumpus, 21, from Henderson, Ky., will spend the next three and a half months serving as an official ambassador for the city of Louisville during various Derby festivities and events.

“It is such an amazing honor to be selected as a Kentucky Derby Festival Princess, and I am very excited to be involved with the Festival in such a unique way … at one of the world’s greatest community events,” she said. “The Kentucky Derby is such an important part of Kentucky history – and the Kentucky Derby Festival has made it more than just two minutes of horse racing.”

Bumpus said she will be committed to the Kentucky Derby Festival 24 hours a day once the festivities begin – and with a responsibility like this, a person would have to be.

Her reign will begin at the Poster Premiere held on Jan. 27 and will last through the Pegasus Parade May 5, totaling nearly 70 events overall, to include Thunder over Louisville, the Great Steamboat Race and an appearance on NBC’s “Today Show” with the other Princesses. Most of the events will be within a two-week time span. This may seem like a bit much for a graduating senior who is president of the RSA, a member of two honor societies and an active member of Delta Zeta sorority, but Bumpus said she is up for the challenge.

“I am lucky enough to have … a schedule that will allow me to attend,” she said. “My professors have been so wonderful already in allowing me to arrange my finals in order to accommodate the schedule.”

At a press conference held earlier this month, the names of the six princesses were announced, selected from an initial field of 80 applicants. The applicants were graded on “knowledge of the Derby Festival, poise, intelligence, personality and campus and community involvement.”

Bumpus was the only U of L student selected, making her a campus spokeswoman and student body representative. Bumpus sees the university as being an integral part of the city as well as an important factor in her being crowned.

“I hope to be able to represent the excellent educational and extracurricular opportunities the university offers,” she said. “There is no way I could have been selected … without the experiences I have had at the university.”

On April 22, Bumpus will find out if her collegiate career gets a fairy tale ending when the Derby Festival Queen is crowned at the annual Fillies’ Derby Ball.

“Being crowned a Kentucky Derby Festival Princess is an enormous honor,” Bumpus said. “But you never know how anything will turn out!”